Posts Tagged ‘sub’

Find all hidden files in Linux, Delete, Copy, Move all hidden files

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

search-find-all-hidden-files-linux-delete-all-hidden-files
Listing hidden files is one of the common thing to do as sys admin. Doing manipulations with hidden files like copy / delete / move is very rare but still sometimes necessary here is how to do all this.

1. Find and show (only) all hidden files in current directory

find . -iname '.*' -maxdepth 1

maxdepth – makes files show only in 1 directory depth (only in current directory), for instance to list files in 2 subdirectories use -maxdepth 3 etc.

echo .*;

Yeah if you're Linux newbie it is useful to know echo command can be used instead of ls.
echo * command is very useful on systems with missing ls (for example if you mistakenly deleted it 🙂 )

2. Find and show (only) all hidden directories, sub-directories in current directory

To list all directories use cmd:

find /path/to/destination/ -iname ".*" -maxdepth 1 -type d

3. Log found hidden files / directories

find . -iname ".*" -maxdept 1 -type f | tee -a hidden_files.log

find . -iname ".*" -maxdepth 1 type d | tee -a hidden_directories.log
4. Delete all hidden files in current directory

cd /somedirectory
find . -iname ".*" -maxdepth 1 -type f -delete

5. Delete all hidden files in current directory

cd /somedirectory
find . -iname ".*" -maxdepth 1 -type d -delete

6. Copy all hidden files from current directory to other "backup" dir

find . -iname ".*" -maxdepth 1 -type f -exec cp -rpf '{}' directory-to-copy-to/ ;

7. Copy and move all hidden sub-directories from current directory to other "backup" dir

find . -iname ".*" -maxdepth 1 -type d -exec cp -rpf '{}' directory-to-copy-to/ ;

– Moving all hidden sub-directories from current directory to backup dir

find . -iname ".*" -maxdepth 1 -type d -exec mv '{}' directory-to-copy-to/ ;

 

How to configure ssh to automatically connect to non standard ssh port numbers (!port 22)

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011

SSH Artistic Logo, don't give away your password

Today I’ve learned from a admin colleague, a handy tip.
I’m administrating some Linux servers which are configured on purpose not to run on the default ssh port number (22) and therefore each time I connect to a host I have to invoke the ssh command with -p PORT_NUMBER option.

This is not such a problem, however when one has to administrate a dozen of servers each of which is configured to listen for ssh connections on various port numbers, every now and then I had to check in my notes which was the correct ssh port number I’m supposed to connect to.

To get around this silly annoyance the ssh client has a feature, whether a number of ssh server hosts can be preconfigured from the ~/.ssh/config in order to later automatically recognize the port number to which the corresponding host will be connecting (whenever) using the ssh user@somehost without any -p argument specified.

In order to make the “auto detection” of the ssh port number, the ~/.ssh/config file should look something similar to:

hipo@noah:~$ cat ~/.ssh/config
Host home.*.pc-freak.net
User root
Port 2020
Host www.remotesystemadministration.com
User root
Port 1212
Host sub.pc-freak.net
User root
Port 2222
Host www.example-server-host.com
User root
Port 1234

The *.pc-freak.net specifies that all ssh-able subdomains belonging to my domain pc-freak.net should be by default sshed to port 2020

Now I can simply use:

hipo@noah:~$ ssh root@myhosts.com

And I can connect without bothering to remember port numbers or dig into an old notes.
Hope this ssh tip is helpful.