Posts Tagged ‘script’

Monitoring Linux hardware Hard Drives / Temperature and Disk with lm_sensors / smartd / hddtemp and Zabbix Userparameter lm_sensors report script

Thursday, April 30th, 2020

monitoring-linux-hardware-with-software-temperature-disk-cpu-health-zabbix-userparameter-script

I'm part of a  SysAdmin Team that is partially doing some minor Zabbix imrovements on a custom corporate installed Zabbix in an ongoing project to substitute the previous HP OpenView monitoring for a bunch of Legacy Linux hosts.
As one of the necessery checks to have is regarding system Hardware, the task was to invent some simplistic way to monitor hardware with the Zabbix Monitoring tool.  Monitoring Bare Metal servers hardware of HP / Dell / Fujituse etc. servers  in Linux usually is done with a third party software provided by the Hardware vendor. But as this requires an additional services to run and sometimes is not desired. It was interesting to find out some alternative Linux native ways to do the System hardware monitoring.
Monitoring statistics from the system hardware components can be obtained directly from the server components with ipmi / ipmitool (for more info on it check my previous article Reset and Manage intelligent  Platform Management remote board article).
With ipmi
 hardware health info could be received straight from the ILO / IDRAC / HPMI of the server. However as often the Admin-Lan of the server is in a seperate DMZ secured network and available via only a certain set of routed IPs, ipmitool can't be used.

So what are the other options to use to implement Linux Server Hardware Monitoring?

The tools to use are perhaps many but I know of two which gives you most of the information you ever need to have a prelimitary hardware damage warning system before the crash, these are:
 

1. smartmontools (smartd)

Smartd is part of smartmontools package which contains two utility programs (smartctl and smartd) to control and monitor storage systems using the Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology system (SMART) built into most modern ATA/SATA, SCSI/SAS and NVMe disks

Disk monitoring is handled by a special service the package provides called smartd that does query the Hard Drives periodically aiming to find a warning signs of hardware failures.
The downside of smartd use is that it implies a little bit of extra load on Hard Drive read / writes and if misconfigured could reduce the the Hard disk life time.

linux:~#  /usr/sbin/smartctl -a /dev/sdb2
smartctl 6.6 2017-11-05 r4594 [x86_64-linux-4.19.0-5-amd64] (local build)
Copyright (C) 2002-17, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org

=== START OF INFORMATION SECTION ===
Device Model:     KINGSTON SA400S37240G
Serial Number:    50026B768340AA31
LU WWN Device Id: 5 0026b7 68340aa31
Firmware Version: S1Z40102
User Capacity:    240,057,409,536 bytes [240 GB]
Sector Size:      512 bytes logical/physical
Rotation Rate:    Solid State Device
Device is:        Not in smartctl database [for details use: -P showall]
ATA Version is:   ACS-3 T13/2161-D revision 4
SATA Version is:  SATA 3.2, 6.0 Gb/s (current: 3.0 Gb/s)
Local Time is:    Thu Apr 30 14:05:01 2020 EEST
SMART support is: Available – device has SMART capability.
SMART support is: Enabled

=== START OF READ SMART DATA SECTION ===
SMART overall-health self-assessment test result: PASSED

General SMART Values:
Offline data collection status:  (0x00) Offline data collection activity
                                        was never started.
                                        Auto Offline Data Collection: Disabled.
Self-test execution status:      (   0) The previous self-test routine completed
                                        without error or no self-test has ever
                                        been run.
Total time to complete Offline
data collection:                (  120) seconds.
Offline data collection
capabilities:                    (0x11) SMART execute Offline immediate.
                                        No Auto Offline data collection support.
                                        Suspend Offline collection upon new
                                        command.
                                        No Offline surface scan supported.
                                        Self-test supported.
                                        No Conveyance Self-test supported.
                                        No Selective Self-test supported.
SMART capabilities:            (0x0002) Does not save SMART data before
                                        entering power-saving mode.
                                        Supports SMART auto save timer.
Error logging capability:        (0x01) Error logging supported.
                                        General Purpose Logging supported.
Short self-test routine
recommended polling time:        (   2) minutes.
Extended self-test routine
recommended polling time:        (  10) minutes.

SMART Attributes Data Structure revision number: 1
Vendor Specific SMART Attributes with Thresholds:
ID# ATTRIBUTE_NAME          FLAG     VALUE WORST THRESH TYPE      UPDATED  WHEN_FAILED RAW_VALUE
  1 Raw_Read_Error_Rate     0x0032   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       –       100
  9 Power_On_Hours          0x0032   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       –       2820
 12 Power_Cycle_Count       0x0032   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       –       21
148 Unknown_Attribute       0x0000   100   100   000    Old_age   Offline      –       0
149 Unknown_Attribute       0x0000   100   100   000    Old_age   Offline      –       0
167 Unknown_Attribute       0x0000   100   100   000    Old_age   Offline      –       0
168 Unknown_Attribute       0x0012   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       –       0
169 Unknown_Attribute       0x0000   100   100   000    Old_age   Offline      –       0
170 Unknown_Attribute       0x0000   100   100   010    Old_age   Offline      –       0
172 Unknown_Attribute       0x0032   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       –       0
173 Unknown_Attribute       0x0000   100   100   000    Old_age   Offline      –       0
181 Program_Fail_Cnt_Total  0x0032   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       –       0
182 Erase_Fail_Count_Total  0x0000   100   100   000    Old_age   Offline      –       0
187 Reported_Uncorrect      0x0032   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       –       0
192 Power-Off_Retract_Count 0x0012   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       –       16
194 Temperature_Celsius     0x0022   034   052   000    Old_age   Always       –       34 (Min/Max 19/52)
196 Reallocated_Event_Count 0x0032   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       –       0
199 UDMA_CRC_Error_Count    0x0032   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       –       0
218 Unknown_Attribute       0x0032   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       –       0
231 Temperature_Celsius     0x0000   097   097   000    Old_age   Offline      –       97
233 Media_Wearout_Indicator 0x0032   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       –       2104
241 Total_LBAs_Written      0x0032   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       –       1857
242 Total_LBAs_Read         0x0032   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       –       1141
244 Unknown_Attribute       0x0000   100   100   000    Old_age   Offline      –       32
245 Unknown_Attribute       0x0000   100   100   000    Old_age   Offline      –       107
246 Unknown_Attribute       0x0000   100   100   000    Old_age   Offline      –       15940

SMART Error Log Version: 1
No Errors Logged

SMART Self-test log structure revision number 1
No self-tests have been logged.  [To run self-tests, use: smartctl -t]

Selective Self-tests/Logging not supported

2. hddtemp

Usually if smartd is used it is useful to also use hddtemp which relies on smartd data.
 The hddtemp program monitors and reports the temperature of PATA, SATA
 or SCSI hard drives by reading Self-Monitoring Analysis and Reporting
 Technology (S.M.A.R.T.)
information on drives that support this feature.
 

linux:~# /usr/sbin/hddtemp /dev/sda1
/dev/sda1: Hitachi HDS721050CLA360: 31°C
linux:~# /usr/sbin/hddtemp /dev/sdc6
/dev/sdc6: KINGSTON SV300S37A120G: 25°C
linux:~# /usr/sbin/hddtemp /dev/sdb2
/dev/sdb2: KINGSTON SA400S37240G: 34°C
linux:~# /usr/sbin/hddtemp /dev/sdd1
/dev/sdd1: WD Elements 10B8: S.M.A.R.T. not available

3. lm-sensors / i2c-tools 

 Lm-sensors is a hardware health monitoring package for Linux. It allows you
 to access information from temperature, voltage, and fan speed sensors.
i2c-tools
was historically bundled in the same package as lm_sensors but has been seperated cause not all hardware monitoring chips are I2C devices, and not all I2C devices are hardware monitoring chips.

The most basic use of lm-sensors is with the sensors command

linux:~# sensors
i350bb-pci-0600
Adapter: PCI adapter
loc1:         +55.0 C  (high = +120.0 C, crit = +110.0 C)

coretemp-isa-0000
Adapter: ISA adapter
Physical id 0:  +28.0 C  (high = +78.0 C, crit = +88.0 C)
Core 0:         +26.0 C  (high = +78.0 C, crit = +88.0 C)
Core 1:         +28.0 C  (high = +78.0 C, crit = +88.0 C)
Core 2:         +28.0 C  (high = +78.0 C, crit = +88.0 C)
Core 3:         +28.0 C  (high = +78.0 C, crit = +88.0 C)

 


On CentOS Linux useful tool is also  lm_sensors-sensord.x86_64 – A Daemon that periodically logs sensor readings to syslog or a round-robin database, and warns of sensor alarms.

In Debian Linux there is also the psensors-server (an HTTP server providing JSON Web service which can be used by GTK+ Application to remotely monitor sensors) useful for developers
psesors-server

psensor-linux-graphical-tool-to-check-cpu-hard-disk-temperature-unix

If you have a Xserver installed on the Server accessed with Xclient or via VNC though quite rare,
You can use xsensors or Psensora GTK+ (Widget Toolkit for creating Graphical User Interface) application software.

With this 3 tools it is pretty easy to script one liners and use the Zabbix UserParameters functionality to send hardware report data to a Company's Zabbix Sserver, though Zabbix has already some templates to do so in my case, I couldn't import this templates cause I don't have Zabbix Super-Admin credentials, thus to work around that a sample work around is use script to monitor for higher and critical considered temperature.
Here is a tiny sample script I came up in 1 min time it can be used to used as 1 liner UserParameter and built upon something more complex.

SENSORS_HIGH=`sensors | awk '{ print $6 }'| grep '^+' | uniq`;
SENSORS_CRIT=`sensors | awk '{ print $9 }'| grep '^+' | uniq`; ;SENSORS_STAT=`sensors|grep -E 'Core\s' | awk '{ print $1" "$2" "$3 }' | grep "$SENSORS_HIGH|$SENSORS_CRIT"`;
if [ ! -z $SENSORS_STAT ]; then
echo 'Temperature HIGH';
else 
echo 'Sensors OK';
fi 

Of course there is much more sophisticated stuff to use for monitoring out there


Below script can be easily adapted and use on other Monitoring Platforms such as Nagios / Munin / Cacti / Icinga and there are plenty of paid solutions, but for anyone that wants to develop something from scratch just like me I hope this
article will be a good short introduction.
If you know some other Linux hardware monitoring tools, please share.

Automatic network restart and reboot Linux server script if ping timeout to gateway is not responding as a way to reduce connectivity downtimes

Monday, December 10th, 2018

automatic-server-network-restart-and-reboot-script-if-connection-to-server-gateway-inavailable-tux-penguing-ascii-art-bin-bash

Inability of server to come back online server automaticallyafter electricity / network outage

These days my home server  is experiencing a lot of issues due to Electricity Power Outages, a construction dig operations to fix / change waterpipe tubes near my home are in action and perhaps the power cables got ruptered by the digger machine.
The effect of all this was that my server networking accessability was affected and as I didn't have network I couldn't access it remotely anymore at a certain point the electricity was restored (and the UPS charge could keep the server up), however the server accessibility did not due restore until I asked a relative to restart it or under a more complicated cases where Tech aquanted guy has to help – Alexander (Alex) a close friend from school years check his old site here – alex.pc-freak.net helps a lot.to restart the machine physically either run a quick restoration commands on root TTY terminal or generally do check whether default router is reachable.

This kind of Pc-Freak.net downtime issues over the last month become too frequent (the machine was down about 5 times for 2 to 5 hours and this was too much (and weirdly enough it was not accessible from the internet even after electricity network was restored and the only solution to that was a physical server restart (from the Power Button).

To decrease the number of cases in which known relatives or friends has to  physically go to the server and restart it, each time after network or electricity outage I wrote a small script to check accessibility towards Default defined Network Gateway for my server with few ICMP packages sent with good old PING command
and trigger a network restart and system reboot
(in case if the network restart does fail) in a row.

1. Create reboot-if-nwork-is-downsh script under /usr/sbin or other dir

Here is the script itself:

#!/bin/sh
# Script checks with ping 5 ICMP pings 10 times to DEF GW and if so
# triggers networking restart /etc/inid.d/networking restart
# Then does another 5 x 10 PINGS and if ping command returns errors,
# Reboots machine
# This script is useful if you run home router with Linux and you have
# electricity outages and machine doesn't go up if not rebooted in that case

GATEWAY_HOST='192.168.0.1';

run_ping () {
for i in $(seq 1 10); do
    ping -c 5 $GATEWAY_HOST
done

}

reboot_f () {
if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
        echo "$(date "+%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S") Ping to $GATEWAY_HOST OK" >> /var/log/reboot.log
    else
    /etc/init.d/networking restart
        echo "$(date "+%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S") Restarted Network Interfaces:" >> /tmp/rebooted.txt
    for i in $(seq 1 10); do ping -c 5 $GATEWAY_HOST; done
    if [ $? -eq 0 ] && [ $(cat /tmp/rebooted.txt) -lt ‘5’ ]; then
         echo "$(date "+%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S") Ping to $GATEWAY_HOST FAILED !!! REBOOTING." >> /var/log/reboot.log
        /sbin/reboot

    # increment 5 times until stop
    [[ -f /tmp/rebooted.txt ]] || echo 0 > /tmp/rebooted.txt
    n=$(< /tmp/rebooted.txt)
        echo $(( n + 1 )) > /tmp/rebooted.txt
    fi
    # if 5 times rebooted sleep 30 mins and reset counter
    if [ $(cat /tmprebooted.txt) -eq ‘5’ ]; then
    sleep 1800
        cat /dev/null > /tmp/rebooted.txt
    fi
fi

}
run_ping;
reboot_f;

You can download a copy of reboot-if-nwork-is-down.sh script here.

As you see in script successful runs  as well as its failures are logged on server in /var/log/reboot.log with respective timestamp.
Also a counter to 5 is kept in /tmp/rebooted.txt, incremented on each and every script run (rebooting) if, the 5 times increment is matched

a sleep is executed for 30 minutes and the counter is being restarted.
The counter check to 5 guarantees the server will not get restarted if access to Gateway is not continuing for a long time to prevent the system is not being restarted like crazy all time.
 

2. Create a cron job to run reboot-if-nwork-is-down.sh every 15 minutes or so 

I've set the script to re-run in a scheduled (root user) cron job every 15 minutes with following  job:

To add the script to the existing cron rules without rewriting my old cron jobs and without tempering to use cronta -u root -e (e.g. do the cron job add in a non-interactive mode with a single bash script one liner had to run following command:

{ crontab -l; echo "*/15 * * * * /usr/sbin/reboot-if-nwork-is-down.sh 2>&1 >/dev/null; } | crontab –


I know restarting a server to restore accessibility is a stupid practice but for home-use or small client servers with unguaranteed networks with a cheap Uninterruptable Power Supply (UPS) devices it is useful.

Summary

Time will show how efficient such a  "self-healing script practice is.
Even though I'm pretty sure that even in a Corporate businesses and large Public / Private Hybrid Clouds where access to remote mounted NFS / XFS / ZFS filesystems are failing a modifications of the script could save you a lot of nerves and troubles and unhappy customers / managers screaming at you on the phone 🙂


I'll be interested to hear from others who have a better  ideas to restore ( resurrect ) access to inessible Linux server after an outage.?
 

Install simscan on Qmail for better Mail server performance and get around unexisting suid perl in newer Linux Debian / Ubuntu servers

Tuesday, August 18th, 2015

qmail-fixing-clamdscan-errors-and-qq-errors-qmail-binary-migration-few-things-to-check-outclamav_logo-installing-clamav-antivirus-to-scan-periodically-debian-server-websites-for-viruses

I've been stuck with qmail-scanner-queue for a while on each and every new Qmail Mail server installation, I've done, this time it was not different but as time evolves and Qmail and Qmail Scanner Wrapper are not regularly updated it is getting, harder and harder to make a fully functional Qmail on newer Linux server distribution releases.

I know many would argue QMAIL is already obsolete but still I have plenty of old servers running QMAIL whose migration might cause more troubles than just continuing to use QMAIL. Moreover QMAIL once set-upped works like a charm.

I've been recently experiencing severe issues with clamdscan errors and I tried to work around this with compiling and using a suid wrapper, however still the clamdscan errors continued and as qmail-scanner is not actively developed and it is much slower than simscan, I've finally decided to give simscan as a mean to fix the clamdscan errors and thanksfully this worked as a solution.

Here is what I did "rawly" to make simscan work on this install:
 

Make sure simscan is properly installed on Debian Linux 7 or Ubuntu servers and probably (should work) on other Deb based Linuxes by following below steps:
 

a) Configure simscan with following compile time options as root (superuser)

./configure \
–enable-user=qscand \
–enable-clamav \
–enable-clamdscan=/usr/local/bin/clamdscan \
–enable-custom-smtp-reject=y \
–enable-per-domain=y \
–enable-attach=y \
–enable-dropmsg=n \
–enable-spam=y \
–enable-spam-hits=5 \
–enable-spam-passthru=y \
–enable-qmail-queue=/var/qmail/bin/qmail-queue \
–enable-ripmime=/usr/local/bin/ripmime \
–enable-sigtool-path=/usr/local/bin/sigtool \
–enable-received=y


b) Compile it

 make && make install-strip

c) Fix any wrong permissions of simscan queue directory

chmod g+s /var/qmail/simscan/

chown -R qscand:qscand /var/qmail/simscan/
chmod -R 777 simscan/chown -R qscand:qscand simscan/
chown -R qscand:qscand simscan/

d) Add some additional simscan options (how simscan is how to perform scans)

The restart qmail to make mailserver start using simscan instead of qmail-scanner, run below command (again as root):

echo ":clam=yes,spam=yes,spam_hits=8.5,attach=.vbs:.lnk:.scr:.wsh:.hta:.pif" > /var/qmail/control/simcontrol

e) Run /var/qmail/bin/simscanmk in order to convert /var/qmail/control/simcontrol into the /var/qmail/control/simcontrol.cdb database

/var/qmail/bin/simscanmk
/var/qmail/bin/simscanmk -g

f) Modify /service/qmail-smtpd/run to set simscan to be default Antivirus Wrapper Scanner

vim /service/qmail-smtpd/run

I'm using thibs's run script so I've uncommented the line there:

QMAILQUEUE="$VQ/bin/simscan"

Below two lines should stay commented as qmail-scanner is no longer used:

##QMAILQUEUE="$VQ/bin/qmail-scanner-queue"
##QMAILQUEUE="$VQ/bin/qmail-scanner-queue.pl"
export QMAILQUEUE

qmailctl restart
* Stopping qmail-smtpdssl.
* Stopping qmail-smtpd.
* Sending qmail-send SIGTERM and restarting.
* Restarting qmail-smtpd.
* Restarting qmail-smtpdssl.

g) Test whether simscan is properly sending / receiving emails:

echo "Testing Email" >> /tmp/mailtest.txt
env QMAILQUEUE=/var/qmail/bin/simscan SIMSCAN_DEBUG=3 /var/qmail/bin/qmail-inject hipo@my-mailserver.com < /tmp/mailtest.txt

Besides that as I'm using qscand:qscand as a user for my overall Qmail Thibs install I had to also do:

chown -R qscand:qscand /var/qmail/simscan/
chmod -R 777 simscan/
chown -R qscand:qscand simscan/

It might be a good idea to also place that lines in /etc/rc.local to auto change permissions on Linux boot, just in case something wents wrong with permissions.

Yeah, I know 777 is unsecure but without this permissions, I was still getting errors, plus the server doesn't have any accounts except the administrator, so I do not worry other system users might sniff on email 🙂

h) Test whether Qmail mail server send / receives fine with simscan

After that I've used another mail server with mail command to test whether mail is received:
 

mail -s "testing email1234" hipo@new-configured-qmail-server.com
asdfadsf
.
Cc:

Then it is necessery to also install latest clamav daemon from source in my case that's on Debian GNU / Linux 7, because somehow the Debian shipped binary version of clamav 0.98.5+dfsg-0+deb7u2 does fail to scan any incoming or outgoing email with error:
 

clamdscan: corrupt or unknown clamd scanner error or memory/resource/perms problem – exit status -1/72057594037927935

So to fix it you will have to install clamav on Debian Linux from source.


Voilla, that's all finally it worked !

How to Remove / Add SuSE Linux start service command

Thursday, July 2nd, 2015

opensuse-remove-add-new-service-geeko-suse-linux-mini-logo
If you happen to administer SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 9 (x86_64) and you need to add or remove already existing /etc/init.d script or custom created Apache / Tomcat .. etc. service and you're already familiar with Fedora's / RHEL chkconfig, then the good news chkconfig is also available on SuSE and you can use in same way chkconfig to start / stop / enable / disable boot time services.

To list all available boot time init.d services use:
 

suse-linux:/etc # chkconfig –list

SuSEfirewall2_final       0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
SuSEfirewall2_init        0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
SuSEfirewall2_setup       0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
Tivoli_lcfd1.bkp          0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
activate_web_all          0:off  1:off  2:off  3:on   4:off  5:on   6:off
alsasound                 0:off  1:off  2:on   3:on   4:off  5:on   6:off
apache2                   0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
apache2-eis               0:off  1:off  2:off  3:on   4:off  5:off  6:off
atd                       0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
audit                     0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
autofs                    0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
autoyast                  0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.clock                0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.crypto               0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.device-mapper        0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.evms                 0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.idedma               0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.ipconfig             0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.isapnp               0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.klog                 0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.ldconfig             0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.loadmodules          0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.localfs              0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.localnet             0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.lvm                  0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.md                   0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.multipath            0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.proc                 0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.restore_permissions  0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.rootfsck             0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.sched                0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.scpm                 0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.scsidev              0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.shm                  0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.swap                 0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.sysctl               0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
boot.udev                 0:off  1:off  2:off  3:off  4:off  5:off  6:off
coldplug                  0:off  1:on   2:on   3:on   4:off  5:on   6:off

To then stop the service:
 

suse-linux:/etc # chkconfig gtiweb off


If you prefer to do it the SuSE way and learn a bit more on SuSE boot time process check out:

suse-linux:/etc # man insserv


Removing already existing SuSE start-up script from init.d start up with insserv is done with:

suse-linux:/etc # cd /etc/init.d/
suse-linux:etc/init.d # insserv -r gtiweb
insserv: script ipmi.hp: service ipmidrv already provided!
insserv: script boot.multipath.2008-10-29: service boot.multipath already provided!


To install a new custom written and placed into /etc/inti.d/ on SuSE's server boot time with insserv:

suse-linux:/etc/init.d/ # insserv your_custom_script_name

Windows add / delete services command sc.exe create/delete – Create or Delete services

Thursday, April 9th, 2015

sc-exe-command-line-program-to-create-delete--service-start-stop-service-on-ms-windows
If you end up in situation where you need to delete or create services from current existing ones with a batch script because it is existing on multiple servers and you want to automate / deploy it via batch (.bat) script you will have to use sc.exe tool – Service Controller Command Tool

SC.EXE command  is standard windows console tool to create and delete services. If you want to create a new service, you can use the "create" parameter.

1. Deleting Service with Windows Service Controller Tool

Deleting service is very easy to do you just have to know the service you like to remove not to be listed or Automatically start

sc delete SERVICE_NAME_TO_BE_REMOVED


Below is a real time example on how to remove Apache webserver configured to auto-start

sc.exe delete ApacheService

[SC] DeleteService SUCCESS

2. Create / Add service to existing to auto start on Windows

Before running sc.exe create command with arguments for service you will need to know following info:

  • What will be the Service Name: A single word to name the new service.
  • Full Binary Path: The path name where the executable program for new service is currently located.
  • Dispaly Name for service: A short name for the new service.

C:\Windows>sc.exe create ApacheService 
   binPath= "C:\local\apache\bin\httpd.exe -k runservice" 
   DisplayName= "Apache Server"

[SC] CreateService SUCCESS


Once service is added to be showing in services.msc GUI  you can start the newly added Apache service with:

C:\Windows>sc.exe start ApacheService

SERVICE_NAME: ApacheService
   TYPE               : 10  WIN32_OWN_PROCESS
   STATE              : 2  START_PENDING
                      (NOT_STOPPABLE,NOT_PAUSABLE,IGNORES_SHUTDOWN)
   WIN32_EXIT_CODE    : 0  (0x0)
   SERVICE_EXIT_CODE  : 0  (0x0)
   CHECKPOINT         : 0x2
   WAIT_HINT          : 0x7530
   PID                : 2552
   FLAGS              :


To stop the ApacheService or any other service:

C:\Windows>sc.exe stop ApacheService

SERVICE_NAME: ApacheService
   TYPE               : 10  WIN32_OWN_PROCESS
   STATE              : 3  STOP_PENDING
                      (NOT_STOPPABLE,NOT_PAUSABLE,IGNORES_SHUTDOWN)
   WIN32_EXIT_CODE    : 0  (0x0)
   SERVICE_EXIT_CODE  : 0  (0x0)
   CHECKPOINT         : 0x4
   WAIT_HINT          : 0x7530


To get the status of a running service lets say the recently ran ApacheService:

C:\Windows>sc.exe query ApacheService

SERVICE_NAME: ApacheService
   TYPE               : 10  WIN32_OWN_PROCESS
   STATE              : 4  RUNNING
                      (STOPPABLE,NOT_PAUSABLE,IGNORES_SHUTDOWN)
   WIN32_EXIT_CODE    : 0  (0x0)
   SERVICE_EXIT_CODE  : 0  (0x0)
   CHECKPOINT         : 0x0
   WAIT_HINT          : 0x0


As you see from above output the STATE of service is RUNNING. If Apache Webserver was not running you will get an error like:

[SC] EnumQueryServicesStatus:OpenService FAILED 1060:
The specified service does not exist as an installed service.

Enjoy sc-ing 🙂

Weblogic – How to change / remove IP/hostname quick and dirty howto

Wednesday, March 11th, 2015

Oracle-Weblogic-Server-logo-how-to-change-ip-hostname-weblogic-quick-and-dirty-howto

This is just quick & dirty doc on how to change/remove IP/host on Oracle WebLogic Application server

– In logs the Error message will be message like:

<Oct 21, 2013 1:06:51 AM SGT> <Warning> <Security> <BEA-090504> <Certificate chain received from cluster2.yourdomain.com – 192.168.1.41 failed hostname verification check. Certificate contained cluster1.yourdomain.com but check expected cluster2.yourdomain.com>

Solution:

On web console – change/remove IP/hostname

As root / admin supersuser:

– Stop Weblogic Webserver 

As this is RHEL Linux, to stop WLS use standard init script start / stop service command

service wls stop

– As Application user create directory where new key will be created

mkdir /home/uwls11pp/tmp_key
cd /home/uwls11pp/tmp_key

– Make backup of current JKS (Keystore File)

cp /WLS/app/oracle/wls1036/wlserver_10.3/server/lib/DemoIdentity.jks /WLS/app/oracle/wls1036/wlserver_10.3/server/lib/DemoIdentity.jks_11032015

– Execute set env . script

/WLS/app/oracle/wls1036/wlserver_10.3/server/bin/setWLSEnv.sh

– Copy & paste output from script above and export variables

export CLASSPATH;
export PATH;

– Check old certificate in keystore

/WLS/app/oracle/jdk1.7.0_25/bin/keytool -list -v -keystore /WLS/app/oracle/wls1036/wlserver_10.3/server/lib/DemoIdentity.jks  -storepass DemoIdentityKeyStorePassPhrase

– Delete old Weblogic keystore JKS file

/WLS/app/oracle/jdk1.7.0_25/bin/keytool -delete -alias demoidentity -keystore /WLS/app/oracle/wls1036/wlserver_10.3/server/lib/DemoIdentity.jks -storepass DemoIdentityKeyStorePassPhrase

– Check wether proper Java version is used

java -version

– Get hostname from hosts file

cat /etc/hosts

#Replace weblogic1 with your FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name) – this step will create new certificate with new hostname

java utils.CertGen -cn weblogic1 -keyfilepass DemoIdentityPassPhrase -certfile newcert -keyfile newkey

#Import certificate to “official” keystore

java utils.ImportPrivateKey -keystore /WLS/app/oracle/wls1036/wlserver_10.3/server/lib/DemoIdentity.jks -storepass DemoIdentityKeyStorePassPhrase -keyfile newkey.pem -keyfilepass DemoIdentityPassPhrase -certfile newcert.pem -alias demoidentity

#Recheck once again if correct certificate is in use

/WLS/app/oracle/jdk1.7.0_25/bin/keytool -list -v -keystore /WLS/app/oracle/wls1036/wlserver_10.3/server/lib/DemoIdentity.jks  -storepass DemoIdentityKeyStorePassPhrase


– Finally issue as root user restart Weblogic server again

service wls start

How to SSH client Login to server with password provided from command line as a script argument – Running same commands to many Linux servers

Friday, March 6th, 2015

ssh-how-to-login-with-password-provided-from-command-line-use-sshpass-to-run-same-command-to-forest-of-linux-servers

Usually admins like me who casuanlly need to administer "forests" (thousands of identicallyconfigured services Linux servers) are generating and using RSA / DSA key authentication for passwordless login, however this is not always possible as some client environments does prohibit the use of RSA / DSA non-pass authentication, thus in such environments to make routine server basic package rpm / deb upgrades or do other maintanance patching its necessery to use normal ssh user / pass login but as ssh client doesn't allow password to be provided from prompt for security reasons and therefore using some custom bash loop to issue single command to many servers (such as explained in my previous article) requires you to copy / paste password on password prompt multiple times. This works its pretty annoying so if you want to run single command on all your 500 servers with specifying the password from password prompt use sshpass tool (for non-interactive ssh password auth).

SSHPASS official site description:
 

sshpass is a utility designed for running ssh using the mode referred to as "keyboard-interactive" password authentication, but in non-interactive mode.

Install sshpass on Debian / Ubuntu (deb based) Linux

sshpass is installable right out of regular repositories so to install run:
 

apt-get install —yes sshpass


Install sshpass on CentOS / Fedora (RPM based) Linux


sshpass is available also across most RPM based distros too so just use yum package manager

 

yum -y install sshpass


If its not available across standard RPM distro provided repositories, there should be RPM on the net for distro just download latest one and use wget and rpm to install:

 wget -q http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/x86_64/sshpass-1.05-1.el6.x86_64.rpm

 rpm -ivh sshpass-1.05-1.el6.x86_64.rpm

How Does SshPass Works?

Normally openssh (ssh) client binary uses direct TTY (/dev/tty)= an abbreviation for PhyTeleTYpewriter or (the admin jargon call Physical Console access)  instead of standard remotely defined /dev/ptsVirtual PTY.
To get around this Sshpass runs ssh in a dedicated TTY to emulate the password is indeed issues by interactive keyboard user thus  fooling remote sshd server to thinking password
is provided by interactive user.


SSHPass use

Very basic standard use which allows you to pass the password from command line is like this:
 

sshpass -p 'Your_Password_Goes_here123' ssh username@server.your-server.com


Note that the server you're working is shared with other developers they might be able to steal your username / password by using a simple process list command such as:
 

 ps auxwwef


In my case security is not a hot issue, as I'm the only user on the server (and only concern might be if someone hacks into the server 🙂 

Then assuming that you have a plain text file with all your administered servers, you can easily use sshpass in a Bash Script loop in order to run, lets say a package upgrade across all identical Linux version machines:
 

while read line; do
sshpass -p 'Your_Password_Goes_here123' ssh username@$line "apt-get update && apt-get upgrade && apt-get dist-upgrade" < /dev/null;
done < all_servers_list.txt

Change the command you like to issue across all machines with the string "apt-get …"
Above command can be used to keep up2date all Debian stable server packages. What you will do on servers is up to your imaginations, very common use of above line would be if you want to see uptime /netstat command output across all your network servers.

while read line; do
sshpass -p 'Your_Password_Goes_here123' ssh username@$line "uptime; who; netstat -tunlp; " < /dev/null;
done < all_servers_list.txt


As you can guess SshPass is swiss army knife tool for admins whoneed to automate things with scripts simultaneously across number of servers.
 

Happy SSH-ing 🙂