Posts Tagged ‘repository’

Non-free packages to install to make Ubuntu Linux Multimedia ready / Post install packages for new Ubuntu installations

Monday, January 23rd, 2012

Reading Time: 2minutes

non-free-packages-to-install-make-ubuntu-linux-multimedia-ready

1. Add Medibuntu package repository

root@ubuntu:~# wget --output-document=/etc/apt/sources.list.d/medibuntu.list \
http://www.medibuntu.org/sources.list.d/$(lsb_release -cs).list \
&& apt-get --quiet update \
&& apt-get --yes --quiet --allow-unauthenticated install medibuntu-keyring \
&& apt-get --quiet update

2. Enable Ubuntu to play Restricted DVD
root@ubuntu:~# apt-get install --yes libdvdread4
...
root@ubuntu:~# /usr/share/doc/libdvdread4/install-css.sh

After that VLC will be ready to play DVDs for some programs which was compiled without DVD, source rebuilt is required.

If DVDs hang you might need to set a Region Code with regionset:

# regionset

3. Install non-free codecs

root@ubuntu:~# apt-get install non-free-codecs

4. Install Chromium ffmpeg nonfree codecs

root@ubuntu:~# apt-get install chromium
root@ubuntu:~# apt-get install chromium-codecs-ffmpeg-nonfree

5. Install w32codecs / w64codecs

Depending on the Ubuntu Linux installation architecture 32/64 bit install w32codecs or w64codecs

For 32 bit (x86) Ubuntu install w32codecs:

root@ubuntu:~# apt-get install w32codecs

For 64 bit arch Ubuntu:

root@ubuntu:~# apt-get install w64codecs

6. Install ubuntu-restricted-extras meta package

root@ubuntu:~# apt-get install ubuntu-restricted-extras

7. Install cheese for webcam picture/video snapshotting

root@ubuntu:~# apt-get install cheese

8. Install GIMP, Inkscape, xsane,sane, shotwell etc.

root@ubuntu:~# apt-get --yes install sane xsane gimp inkscape gimp-data-extras gimp-plugin-registry \
blender gcolor2 showtwell bluefish kompozer

9. Install multimedia Sound & Video utilities

Install Subtitle editor, video editiking , sound editing, mp3 player, iso mounters, DVD/CD Burners

root@ubuntu:~# apt-get install rhythmbox banshee smplayer mplayer \
realplayer audacity brasero jokosher istanbuk gtk-recordMyDesktop \acetoneisohexedit furiusisomount winff fala audacious dvdstyler lives hydrogen
subtitleeditor gnome-subtitles electricsheep k3b

10. Install CD / DVD RIP tools

root@ubuntu:~# apt-get install acidrip sound-juicer ogmrip thoggen
11. Install chat messanger programs, Browsers, mail pop3 clients, torrent, emulators, ftp clients etc.

apt-get install seamonkey thunderbird transmission transmission-gtk gbgoffice kbedic \
pidgin openoffice.org gxine mozilla-plugin-vlc wine dosbox samba filezilla amsn ntp \epiphany-browser ntpdate desktop-webmail alltray chmsee gftp xchat-gnome ghex \gnome-genius bleachbit arista

12. Install Non-Free Flash Player

Unfortunately Gnash is not yet production ready and crashes in many websites …

root@ubuntu:~# apt-get install flashplugin-nonfree flashplugin-nonfree-extrasound swfdec-gnome

13. Install Archive / Unarchive management programs

root@ubuntu:~# apt-get install unace unrar zip unzip p7zip-full p7zip-rar sharutils rar uudeview \
mpack lha arj cabextract file-roller

15. Install VirtualBox and QEmu

root@ubuntu:~# apt-get install qemu-launcher qemu-kvm-extras virtualbox virtualbox-ose \
virtualbox-ose-guest-dkms virtualbox-ose-guest-dkms

This should be enough to use Ubuntu normally for multimedia Desktop just as MS Windows for most of the daily activities.
Am I missing some important program?

Create SVN (Subversion) web statistics on Debian Lenny Linux with mpy-svn-stats and svnstats.sh

Monday, July 5th, 2010

Reading Time: 4minutes
I’ve recently desired to have a visualized statistics on how many commits, imports, people who commit into subversion’s repositories,graphs showing up the most active comitters, commits into the all subversion repositories grouped by month, week etc.
This kind of valuable information can give you insight, on a projects code life cycle. It can also help you to find out who takes most active participation into a certain project code development etc. and therefore could play a vital role in finding out about the work efficiency within your IT company or IT department.

There are plenty of softwares that can generate you some shiny statistics on how often and by whom are commits into your repositories as well as general statistics concerning your repositories accessibility.

Some of the projects suggested by most Linux users online, who had to resolve the same task e.g. (find some decent software to generate them good statistics on the svn use.) are:

1. statsvn

Here is a description on what statsvn is directly taken from its website:

StatSVN retrieves information from a Subversion repository and generates various tables and charts describing the project development, e.g.

StatSVN looks really promising, however what I find personally repulsive about it is that it depends on a Sun Java virtual machine
I have a bad taste for third party software that depends on java and therefore the software uses an XML dump generated from svn log –xml -v path/to/repos > svn-logfile.xml after which it’s necessary to pass the generated svn-logfile.xml file to statsvn, for instance:

statsvn [options] svn-logfile.xml path/to/repos

though a debian of statsvn is available and packaged for Debian in /usr/share/doc/statsvn/README.Debian we read:

Notes to Debian users:

* the jtreemap-based report has been disabled as jtreemap is currently
not packaged for Debian, and Debian cannot ship the applet without
its sources (not included in statsvn’s sources).

— Vincent Fourmond <fourmond@debian.org>, Tue, 4 Mar 2008 21:14:14 +0100

What I understood from statsvn documentation is that jtreemap is absolutely necessary in order to have a running statsvn, regardless if you have or you don’t have a java vm installed.

To take a general idea on what kind of Repo Roadmap does svnstat generates with jtreemap check out the following link

Since jtreemap is not available prepackaged for Debian I decided not to use svnstats though it looked quite superb.

Some further research on the kind of softwares available online able to generate me some statistics from cvs or subversion source repositories led me to,

2. svnplot

svnplot stroke me with it’s perfect looking many graphics generated on the Lines of Code commited, contribution of different authors to the repository, File count, avarage commit file sizes, common activity, author commit activity etc. etc.

I think tt’s worthy to check out some example statistics about a sample repository statistics generated by svnplot to get a better idea what to expect if you choose to install it on your server.

Even though svnplot looked also promising It wasn’t actually my choice because I think it’s not really mature enough as a software, the second reason which hold me back from installing it on my debian server was that I find it too much as a work in progress still.

Since neither svnstast nor svnplot didn’t well match my expectation and lacked a debian package I finally choose:

3. mpy svn stats as a solution to generate and graph information about svn usage

There are few reasons I finally took svn-mpy-stats to be the solution of choice.

1. It is available as a package in Debian Linux and easily installable via apt-get
2. It is written in Python and therefore doesn’t require a java virtual machine or some extra cosmetics to make it work3. It’s really simple and straight forward to configure and already tested and reported that it works well in Debian GNU/Linux

So here is the few simple steps I took to install mpy-svn-stats on Debian Lenny (in Debian Sid / Squeeze I suppose the procedure would be analogous.

– Install mpy-svn-stats via apt-get or aptitude

debian-server:~# apt-get install mpy-svn-stats

Run it for your svn repository with a command like:

debian-server:~# mkdir /var/www/svnstats
/usr/bin/mpy-svn-stats -o /var/www/svnstats/ file:///var/svn-repos/repository_name

In the above command substitute /var/www/svnstats/ and /var/svn-repos/repository_name with a directory of choice where you like to generate the html statistics for the svn usage as well as the full path and name of your repository.

Of course it’s a good idea to make mpy-svn-stats run periodically with for instance crontab or at or any other unix task cheduler available for your Linux system.

So far so good. You have probably already noticed that it’s rather inconvenient because you have to execute mpy-svn-stats command to each of your svn repositories individually.
This is absolute madness if your company is creating new svn source repository projects often, like let’s say everyday, because you will have to generate statistics for each of the repositories either manually or add new repositories manually to a script which will be later invoked by a crontab rule.

To get around this constrain, I’ve come up with a tiny shell script svnstats.sh which takes care for everything on it’s own.

It automatically will loop in your main subversion repositories directory through all the sub-repositories and generate individual html statistics in a separate automatically created directory by the script.

So to make your life easier and automate the process of generating stats with mpy-svn-stats consider downloading svnstats.sh and installing it as a separate rule like so:

debian-server:~# crontab -u root -e

Include therein the following:

# generate svn statistics everyday in 05:20 a.m.20 5 * * * /usr/sbin/svnstats.sh >/dev/null >>&1

Now everyday at 05:20 your mpy-svn-stats will generate a nice graphs and statistics for your subversion repository usage in /var/www/svstats, if you consider generating the data into a different location consider editting the head of mpy-svn-stats svnstats.sh script and change according to your likings.

Now let’s create an Alias in Apache to enable the (mpy-svn-stats generated by svnstats.sh) to be visualized via web:

– Edit VirtualHost configuration file of choice and put there, something like:

Alias /svnstats/ /var/www/svnstats/

Lastly it might be a good idea to use htaccess to protect your url with a password, afterwards you can enjoy your mpy svn statistics.

Debian Linux: Installing and monitoring servers with Icanga (Nagios fork soft)

Monday, June 3rd, 2013

Reading Time: 4minutes

icinga-monitoring-processes-and-servers-linux-logo

There is plenty of software for monitoring how server performs and whether servers are correctly up and running. There is probably no Debian Linux admin who didn't already worked or at least tried Nagios and Mointor to monitor and notify whether server is unreachable or how server services operate. Nagios and Munin are play well together to prevent possible upcoming problems with Web / Db / E-mail services or get notify whether they are completely inaccessible. One similar "next-generation" and less known software is Icanga.
The reason, why to use Icinga  instead of Nagios is  more features a list of what does Icinga supports more than Nagios is on its site here
I recently heard of it and decided to try it myself. To try Icanga I followed Icanga's install tutorial on Wiki.Icanga.Org here
In Debian Wheezy, Icinga is already part of official repositories so installing it like in Squeeze and Lenny does not require use of external Debian BackPorts repositories.

1. Install Icinga pre-requirement packages

debian:# apt-get --yes install php5 php5-cli php-pear php5-xmlrpc php5-xsl php5-gd php5-ldap php5-mysql

2. Install Icanga-web package

debian:~# apt-get --yes install icinga-web

Here you will be prompted a number of times to answer few dialog questions important for security, as well as fill in MySQL server root user / password as well as SQL password that will icinga_web mySQL user use.

icinga-choosing-database-type

configuring-icinga-web-debian-linux-configuring-database-shot

debian-config-screenshot-configuring-icinga-idoutils

icinga-password-confirmation-debian-linux
….

Setting up icinga-idoutils (1.7.1-6) …
dbconfig-common: writing config to /etc/dbconfig-common/icinga-idoutils.conf
granting access to database icinga for icinga-idoutils@localhost: success.
verifying access for icinga-idoutils@localhost: success.
creating database icinga: success.
verifying database icinga exists: success.
populating database via sql…  done.
dbconfig-common: flushing administrative password
Setting up icinga-web (1.7.1+dfsg2-6) …
dbconfig-common: writing config to /etc/dbconfig-common/icinga-web.conf

Creating config file /etc/dbconfig-common/icinga-web.conf with new version
granting access to database icinga_web for icinga_web@localhost: success.
verifying access for icinga_web@localhost: success.
creating database icinga_web: success.
verifying database icinga_web exists: success.
populating database via sql…  done.
dbconfig-common: flushing administrative password

Creating config file /etc/icinga-web/conf.d/database-web.xml with new version
database config successful: /etc/icinga-web/conf.d/database-web.xml

Creating config file /etc/icinga-web/conf.d/database-ido.xml with new version
database config successful: /etc/icinga-web/conf.d/database-ido.xml
enabling config for webserver apache2…
Enabling module rewrite.
To activate the new configuration, you need to run:
  service apache2 restart
`/etc/apache2/conf.d/icinga-web.conf' -> `../../icinga-web/apache2.conf'
[ ok ] Reloading web server config: apache2 not running.
root password updates successfully!
Basedir: /usr Cachedir: /var/cache/icinga-web
Cache already purged!

3. Enable Apache mod_rewrite
 

 

debian:~# a2enmod rewrite
debian:~# /etc/init.d/apache2 restart


4. Icinga documentation files

Some key hints on Enabling some more nice Icinga features are mentioned in Icinga README files, check out, all docs files included with Icinga separate packs are into:
 

debian:~# ls -ld *icinga*/
drwxr-xr-x 3 root root 4096 Jun  3 10:48 icinga-common/
drwxr-xr-x 3 root root 4096 Jun  3 10:48 icinga-core/
drwxr-xr-x 3 root root 4096 Jun  3 10:48 icinga-idoutils/
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Jun  3 10:48 icinga-web/

debian:~# less /usr/share/doc/icinga-web/README.Debian debian:~# less /usr/share/doc/icinga-idoutils/README.Debian

5. Configuring Icinga

Icinga configurations are separated in two directories:

debian:~# ls -ld *icinga*

drwxr-xr-x 4 root root 4096 Jun  3 10:50 icinga
drwxr-xr-x 3 root root 4096 Jun  3 11:07 icinga-web

>

etc/icinga/ – (contains configurations files for on exact icinga backend server behavior)

 

/etc/icinga-web – (contains all kind of Icinga Apache configurations)
Main configuration worthy to look in after install is /etc/icinga/icinga.cfg.

6. Accessing newly installed Icinga via web

To access just installed Icinga, open in browser URL – htp://localhost/icinga-web

icinga web login screen in browser debian gnu linux

logged in inside Icinga / Icinga web view and control frontend

 

7. Monitoring host services with Icinga(NRPE)

As fork of Nagios. Icinga has similar modular architecture and uses number of external plugins to Monitor external host services list of existing plugins is on Icinga's wiki here.
Just like Nagios Icinga supports NRPE protocol (Nagios Remote Plugin Executor). To setup NRPE, nrpe plugin from nagios is used (nagios-nrpe-server). 

To install NRPE on any of the nodes to be tracked;
debian: ~# apt-get install –yes nagios-nrpe-server

 Then to configure NRPE edit /etc/nagios/nrpe_local.cfg


 

Once NRPE is supported in Icinga, you can install on Windows or Linux hosts NRPE clients like in Nagios to report on server processes state and easily monitor if server disk space / load or service is in critical state.

How to install Google Chrome web browser on Debian 7 Wheezy Linux

Wednesday, September 4th, 2013

Reading Time: < 1minute

How to install Google Chrome web browser on Debian Gnu Linux Chrome and tux logo
Just installed Debian 7Linux and wondered how to install Google Chrome Browser on Debian Wheezy. It took me a while until I figure it out, as direct download from Google after searching for Chrome Linux had library requirements which are missing from Debian 7 Wheezy repositories.
Here is how;

1. Add  Wheezy Backports and Google's Chrome Repository to /etc/apt/sources.list

echo 'deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian/ wheezy-backports main contrib non-free' >> /etc/apt/sources.list
echo 'deb http://dl.google.com/linux/chrome/deb/ stable main' >> /etc/apt/sources.list

2. Install Google Chrome with apt-get

Here you have few options install Google Chrome Beta (whether you prefer you're an innovator), install unstable – if you prefer latest functionality and don't count on stability or install stable version.

a) Install Google Chrome Beta

apt-get install --yes google-chrome-beta

b) Install Google Chrome Unstable

apt-get install --yes google-chrome-unstable

c) Install Google Stable

apt-get install --yes google-chrome-stable

I personally prefer always to keep stable so prefer to install google-chrome-stable.

Only reason I need Google-Chrome is for testing how websites looks with it. Otherwise I don't recommend this browser to anyone who cares for his security. Obviously as Chrome is product of Google it is almost certainly it keeps complete surveillance on what you do on the net.

That's all happy web development with Chrome on Debian 🙂
 

How to install / update Wine windows emulator 1.4 on Debian Squeeze Linux

Monday, April 29th, 2013

Reading Time: < 1minute

wine linux ms windows emulator logo with microsoft windows
Debian Squeeze
Linux depending on RC release comes with a Version of WINE Windows emulator 0.9.8 or wine 1.0.1-3.1. This wine version is very out of date already and many of the new win software working well with newer wine releases doesn't work. We all know the down-side of Debian stable releases you always stay a bit outdated.

Thanksfully there is an easy way to upgrade to newer wine version and hence have more Windows software properly running on Squeeze. To do so you need to add custom following wine custom deb repository:

deb http://main.mepis-deb.org/mepiscr/repo/ mepis85cr main

i.e.

debian:~# echo 'deb http://main.mepis-deb.org/mepiscr/repo/ mepis85cr main' >> /etc/apt/sources.list

Then update wine with apt-get:

debian:~# apt-get update
....
debian:~# apt-get --yes install wine ....
The following NEW packages will be installed:
fonts-droid ttf-droid ttf-umefont ttf-unfonts-core wine-gecko
The following packages will be upgraded: wine
1 upgraded, 5 newly installed, 10 to remove and 86 not upgraded.
Need to get 135 MB of archives.

debian:~# dpkg -l |grep -i wine

rc libwine 1.0.1-3.1 Windows API implementation – library
ii playonlinux 3.7.6-1 front-end for Wine
ii wine 1.4-1mcr8.5+1 Windows Compatibility Layer (Binary Emulator and Library)
rc wine-bin 1.0.1-3.1 Windows API implementation – binary loader
ii wine-gecko 1.4.0-1mcr85+2 Microsoft Windows
Compatibility Layer (Web Browser)

That's all enjoy 🙂

Install latest WINE – Win Emulator unstable version on Debian stable Linux

Saturday, April 27th, 2013

Reading Time: < 1minute

wine emulator logo install wine on Debian GNU / Linux

Installing latest stable version of wine is only possible and safe via deb repository on 32 bit Debian archtecture.

Whether not sure about your Debian architecture run:

linux:~# dpkg --add-architecture i386 To install latest unstable version of wine which though unstable is often much useful to its stable predecessors add wine-unstable repository linux:~# wget -q -O- http://www.tataranovich.com/tataranovich.asc | apt-key add -

Finally install / update (whether installed) with:
 

linux:~# apt-get update
linux:~# apt-get --yes install wine-unstable:i386

Enjoy ! 🙂

How to set repository to install binary packages on amd64 FreeBSD 9.1

Friday, January 11th, 2013

Reading Time: < 1minute

Though, it is always good idea to build from source for better performance of Apache + MySQL + PHP, its not worthy the time on installing minor things like; trafshow, tcpdump or deco (MC – midnight commander like native freebsd BSD program).

If you're on a 64 bit version of FreeBSD ( amd64) 9.1 and you try to install a binary package with;

freebsd# pkg_add -vr vim

Ending up with an error;

Error: Unable to get ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/ports/amd64/packages-9.1-release/Latest/vim.tbz: File unavailable (e.g., file not found, no access)
pkg_add: unable to fetch 'ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/ports/amd64/packages-9.1-release/Latest/vim.tbz' by URL
pkg_add: 1 package addition(s) failed

The error is caused by lack of special packages-9.1-release directory existing on FreeBSD.org servers. I've realized this after doing a quick manual check opening ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/ports/amd64. The existing URL containing working fbsd 9.1 binaries is:

ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/ports/amd64/packages-9-current/Latest/
h

You will have toset a repository for FreeBSD 9.1 amd64 packages manually with cmd:
freebsd# echo $SHELL
/bin/csh
freebsd# setenv PACKAGESITE ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/ports/amd64/packages-9-current/Latest/

If you're on bash shell use export instead:

freebsd# export PACKAGESITE="ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/ports/amd64/packages-9-current/Latest/"

To make ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/ports/amd64/packages-9-current/Latest/ as a permanent binary repository:

echo 'setenv PACKAGESITE ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/ports/amd64/packages-9-current/Latest/' >> /root/.cshrc

or

echo 'export PACKAGESITE="ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/ports/amd64/packages-9-current/Latest/"' >> /root/.bashrc

Now, pkg_add as much as you like 😉

Finding nearest package software repository in Debian GNU / Linux

Thursday, September 6th, 2012

Reading Time: 3minutesfinding debian Ubuntu package repository icon

I’m about to chage the good old computeres until this very moment this blog and few other website were running on. Right now, I’m installing the brand new machine Lenovo ThinkCentre Edge great and hopefully powerful enough machine to take care for the periodic occuring high traffic loads which break up webserver or SQL server. Well anyways, I just installed latest Debian GNU / Linux on this brand new piece of iron. During install I couldn’t connect the PC to network so Debian install was unable to determine, the nearest Debian package repository, hence after completing install and anually configuring Debian network . Because during install the system had no connection with the Internet, no proper package repository definitions were present in /etc/apt/sources.list, hence I had to find the nearest package software repository. Normally one can check in Debian official WorldWide Mirror sites full address list and determine by some rationalization with ping or / and a manual package download which repo is quickest. There is thanksfully a better automated way one can determine the closest deb Debian / Ubuntu located repository with netselect-apt.

Here is apt-cache description:

debian:~# apt-cache search netselect-apt
netselect-apt - speed tester for choosing a fast Debian mirror

Using the tool is trivial, just install, run it and it does all 4 u 🙂

1. Install netselect-apt

debian:~# apt-get install --yes netselect-apt

2. Run it

debian:~# netselect-apt
....
130/debian/); keeping only under first name.
netselect: 2 (2 active) nameserver request(s)...

Duplicate address 200.236.31.3 (http://debian.c3sl.ufpr.br/debian/, http://ftp.br.debian.org/debian/); keeping only under first name.
netselect: 1 (1 active) nameserver request(s)...
Running netselect to choose 1 out of 383 addresses.
.............................................
The fastest server seems to be:
http://debian.telecoms.bg/debian/

Writing sources.list.
sources.list exists, moving to sources.list.1346964774
Done.

As you can see from output, the tool finds the quickest download deb repository and generate /etc/apt/sources.list file in current directory, where it is run in, in this exact case it creates it in root user home dir – e.g. in /root/ directory. Once the repo address is found you can copy paste it with some text editor to /etc/apt/sources.list or move it over /etc/apt/sources.list;

debian:~# cp -rpf /etc/apt/sources.list /etc/apt/sources.list.$(date +%d_%m_%Y|sed -e 's/^ *//')
debian:~# mv /root/sources.list /etc/apt/sources.list

Just in case as I always make first copy of original sources.list, this is not necessery but IMHO a generally good sysadmin habit 🙂

Besides netselect-apt, which automatically choose between all available list of software repo servers, there is also netselect tool. netselect does basically the same the only difference is one has to manually pass by as arguments deb package repositories and the tool then does tests and returns which is the overall quickest deb download source.

netselect is definitely useful if you have started few own mirror of repositories and want to determine which is the best among them.

Here is how netselect is used:

# netselect -vv ftp.fceia.unr.edu.ar ftp.kulnet.kuleuven.ac.be \
ftp.cdrom.com ftp.debian.org ftp.de.debian.org
ftp.fceia.unr.edu.ar 2792 ms 23 hops 100% ok ( 1/ 1) [ 9213]
ftp.kulnet.kuleuven.ac.be 9999 ms 30 hops 0% ok
ftp.cdrom.com 94 ms 8 hops 100% ok (10/10) [ 169]
ftp.debian.org 46 ms 15 hops 100% ok (10/10) [ 115]
ftp.de.debian.org 9999 ms 30 hops 0% ok

According to above output, the “best reachable” (quickest) repository is the one to which are the least miliseconds – ftp.debian.org

Thanks to- https://www.wzdftpd.net/blog/index.php? -for the nice Debian package box picture – all copyrights belong to respective authors and licensing.
Cheers ! 🙂