Posts Tagged ‘file tmp’

Adding Listing and Deleting SSL Certificates in keystore Tomcat Application server / What is keystore

Thursday, December 5th, 2013

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Apache Tomcat keystore delete import list logo

 I work on ongoing project where Tomtat Application servers configured to run Clustered located behind Apache with mod_proxy configured to use ReverseProxy are used. One of customers which required a java application deployment experienced issues with application's capability to connect to SAP database.

After some investigation I figured out, the application is unable to connect to the SAP db server becuse remote host webserver running some SAP related stuff was not connecting due to expired certificate in Tomcat Keystore known also as JKS / Java Keystore– (.keystore) – which is a file containing multiple remote hosts imported certificates.

The best and shortest definition of keystore is:

Keystore entry = private + public key pair = identified by an alias

The keystore protects each private key with its individual password, and also protects the integrity of the entire keystore with a (possibly different) password.

Managing Java imported certificates later used by Tomcat is done with a command line tool part of JDK (Java Development Kit) called keystore. Keystore is usually located under /opt/java/jdk/bin/keytool. My Java VM is installed in /opt/ anyways usual location of keytool is $JAVA_HOME/bin/

Keytool has capabilities to create / modify / delete or import new SSL certificates and then Java applications can access remote applications which requires Secure Socket Layer handshake . Each certificate kept in .keystore file (usually located somewhere under Tomcat web app server directory tree), lets say – /opt/tomcat/current/conf/.keystore

1. List current existing imported SSL certificates into Java's Virtual Machine

tomcat-server:~# /opt/java/jdk/bin/keytool -list -keystore /opt/tomcat/current/conf/.keystore
password:
Command returns output similar to;

Entry type: trustedCertEntry

Owner: CN=www.yourhost.com, OU=MEMBER OF E.ON GROUP, OU=DEVICES, O=E.GP AG, C=DE
Issuer: CN=E.ON Internal Devices Sub CA V2, OU=CA, O=EGP, C=DE
Serial number: 67460001001c6aa51fd25c0e8320
Valid from: Mon Dec 27 07:05:33 GMT 2010 until: Fri Dec 27 07:05:22 GMT 2013
Certificate fingerprints:
         MD5:  D1:AA:D5:A9:A3:D2:95:28:F1:79:57:25:D3:6A:16:5E
         SHA1: 73:CE:ED:EC:CA:18:E4:E4:2E:AA:25:58:E0:2B:E4:D4:E7:6E:AD:BF
         Signature algorithm name: SHA1withRSA
         Version: 3

Extensions:

#1: ObjectId: 2.5.29.15 Criticality=true
KeyUsage [
  DigitalSignature
  Key_Encipherment
  Key_Agreement
]

#2: ObjectId: 2.5.29.19 Criticality=true
BasicConstraints:[
  CA:false
  PathLen: undefined
]

#3: ObjectId: 1.3.6.1.5.5.7.1.1 Criticality=false
AuthorityInfoAccess [
  [
   accessMethod: 1.3.6.1.5.5.7.48.2
   accessLocation: URIName: http://yourhost.com/cacerts/egp_internal_devices_sub_ca_v2.crt,
   accessMethod: 1.3.6.1.5.5.7.48.2
   accessLocation: URIName: http://www.yourhost1.com/certservices/cacerts/egp_internal_devices_sub_ca_v2.crt]
]

#4: ObjectId: 2.5.29.14 Criticality=false
SubjectKeyIdentifier [
KeyIdentifier [
0000: D3 52 C7 63 0F 98 BF 6E   FE 00 56 5C DF 35 62 22  .R.c…n..V\.5b"
0010: F2 B9 5B 8F                                        ..[.
]

Note that password that will be promtped has is by default changeit (in case if you don't have explicitly changed it from Tomcat's default config server.xml).

2. Delete Old expired SSL host Certificate from Java Keystore
It is good practice to always make backup of old .keystore before modifying, so I ran:

tomcat-server:~# cp -rpf /opt/tomcat/current/conf/.keystore /opt/tomcat/current/conf/.keystore-05-12-2013

In my case first I had to delete old expired SSL certificate with:

tomcat-server:~# /opt/java/jdk/bin/keytool -delete -alias "your-hostname" -v -keystore /opt/tomcat/current/conf/.keystore

Then to check certificate is no longer existent in keystore chain;
tomcat-server:~# /opt/java/jdk/bin/keytool -list -keystore /opt/tomcat/current/conf/.keystore

-keystore – option is obligitory it does specify where keystore file is located
-list – does list the certificate
-v – stands for verbose

 

3. Finally to import new SSL from already expored via a browser url in keystore

tomcat-server:~# /opt/java/jdk/bin/keytool -importcert -file /tmp/your-hostname.cer -alias your-hostname.com -keystore /opt/tomcat/current/conf/.keystore

More complete information on how to deal with keystore is available from Apache Tomcat's SSL Howto – a must read documentation for anyone managing Tomcat.

How to solve “Incorrect key file for table ‘/tmp/#sql_9315.MYI’; try to repair it” mysql start up error

Saturday, April 28th, 2012

Reading Time: 2 minutes

When a server hard disk scape gets filled its common that Apache returns empty (no content) pages…
This just happened in one server I administer. To restore the normal server operation I freed some space by deleting old obsolete backups.
Actually the whole reasons for this mess was an enormous backup files, which on the last monthly backup overfilled the disk empty space.

Though, I freed about 400GB of space on the the root filesystem and on a first glimpse the system had plenty of free hard drive space, still restarting the MySQL server refused to start up properly and spit error:

Incorrect key file for table '/tmp/#sql_9315.MYI'; try to repair it" mysql start up error

Besides that there have been corrupted (crashed) tables, which reported next to above error.
Checking in /tmp/#sql_9315.MYI, I couldn't see any MYI – (MyISAM) format file. A quick google look up revealed that this error is caused by not enough disk space. This was puzzling as I can see both /var and / partitions had plenty of space so this shouldn't be a problem. Also manally creating the file /tmp/#sql_9315.MYI with:

server:~# touch /tmp/#sql_9315.MYI

Didn't help it, though the file created fine. Anyways a bit of a closer examination I've noticed a /tmp filesystem mounted besides with the other file system mounts ????
You can guess my great amazement to find this 1 Megabyte only /tmp filesystem hanging on the server mounted on the server.

I didn't mounted this 1 Megabyte filesystem, so it was either an intruder or some kind of "weird" bug…
I digged in Googling to see, if I can find more on the error and found actually the whole mess with this 1 mb mounted /tmp partition is caused by, just recently introduced Debian init script /etc/init.d/mountoverflowtmp.
It seems this script was introduced in Debian newer releases. mountoverflowtmp is some kind of emergency script, which is triggered in case if the root filesystem/ space gets filled.
The script has only two options:

# /etc/init.d/mountoverflowtmp
Usage: mountoverflowtmp [start|stop]

Once started what it does it remounts the /tmp to be 1 megabyte in size and stops its execution like it never run. Well maybe, the developers had something in mind with introducing this script I will not argue. What I should complain though is the script design is completely broken. Once the script gets "activated" and does its job. This 1MB mount stays like this, even if hard disk space is freed on the root partition – / ….

Hence to cope with this unhandy situation, once I had freed disk space on the root partition for some reason mountoverflowtmp stop option was not working,
So I had to initiate "hard" unmount:

server:~# mount -l /tmp

Also as I had a bunch of crashed tables and to fix them, also issued on each of the broken tables reported on /etc/init.d/mysql start start-up.

server:~# mysql -u root -p
mysql> use Database_Name;
mysql> repair table Table_Name extended;
....

Then to finally solve the stupid Incorrect key file for table '/tmp/#sql_XXYYZZ33444.MYI'; try to repair it error, I had to restart once again the SQL server:

Stopping MySQL database server: mysqld.
Starting MySQL database server: mysqld.
Checking for corrupt, not cleanly closed and upgrade needing tables..
root@server:/etc/init.d#

Tadadadadam!, SQL now loads and works back as before!

How to fix clamd “ERROR: LOCAL: Socket file /tmp/clamd.socket is in use by another process.”

Monday, May 23rd, 2011

Reading Time: < 1 minute
One of the Qmail server installations I’m taking care of’s clamd antivirus process started loading the system heavily.
After a bit of log reading and investigation I’ve found the following error in my /var/log/clamd/current

@400000004dda1e1815cf03f4 ERROR: LOCAL: Socket file /tmp/clamd.socket is in use by another process.

I’ve noticed in my process list that actually I do have two processes clamd :

11608 ? Sl 0:05 /usr/local/sbin/clamd
11632 ? S 0:00 /usr/bin/multilog t /var/log/clamd
16013 ? Sl 0:06 /usr/local/sbin/clamd

It appeared that for some weird reason one of the clamd process was failing to connect constantly to the clam server socket /tmp/clamd.socket and each time it tried to connect and failed to connect to the socket the system gets about 5% of extra load …

Resolving the issues was a piece of cake, all I had to do is stop the clamd server delete the /tmp/clamd.socket and relaunch the clamd server.

Here is exactly the commands I issued:

debian:~# cd /service/
debian:/service# svc -a clamd
debian:/service# svc -h clamd
debian:/service# svc -d clamd
debian:/service# rm -f /tmp/clamd.socket
debian:/service# svc -u clamd

Afterwards the clamd extra load went out and in /var/log/clamd/current I can see clamd loads fine without errors, e.g.:

Listening daemon: PID: 16013
MaxQueue set to: 150
No stats for Database check - forcing reload
Reading databases from /usr/local/share/clamav
Database correctly reloaded (966822 signatures)
SelfCheck: Database status OK.
...