Posts Tagged ‘example server’

How to encrypt files with GPG and OpenSSL on GNU / Linux

Friday, November 25th, 2011

Encrypt files and directories with OpenSSL and GPG (GNUPG), OpenSSL and GPG encryption logo

I have just recently found out that it is possible to use openssl to encrypt files to tighten your security.
Why would I want to encrypt files? Well very simple, I have plain text files where I write down my passwords for servers or account logins for services I use on the internet.

Before this very day I use gpg to encrypt and decrypt my sensitive information files and archives. The way to encrypt files with GPG is very simple, here is an example:

server:~# ls -al test.txt
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 12 Nov 25 16:50 test.txt
server:~# gpg -c test.txt > test.txt.gpg
Enter passphrase:
Repeat passphrase:

Typing twice the same password produces the encrypted file test.txt.gpg . In order to later decrypt the gpg password protected file I use cmd:

server:~# gpg -d test.txt.gpg >test.txt
Enter passphrase:
Repeat passphrase:
gpg: CAST5 encrypted data
gpg: encrypted with 1 passphrase
gpg: WARNING: message was not integrity protected

As one can see from above output by default gpg uses the CAST5 algorithm to encrypt the data. For all those curious on what kind of encryption does CAST5 provide and where the CAST5 origins are, in short CAST5 is a GNU invented cryptographic algorithm, the short description of the algorithm is as follows:

“…a DES-like Substitution-Permutation Network (SPN) cryptosystem which appears to have good resistance to differential cryptanalysis, linear cryptanalysis, and related-key cryptanalysis. This cipher also possesses a number of other desirable cryptographic properties, including avalanche, Strict Avalanche Criterion (SAC), Bit Independence Criterion (BIC), no complementation property, and an absence of weak and semi-weak keys.”

Anyways, for all those who trust more the DES128 encryption as an encryption algorithm to keep your data secret, the openssl command tool provides another mean to encrypt sensitive data.
To encrypt a file using the openssl’s DES encryption capabilities:

server:~# openssl des -salt -in test.txt -out test.txt.des
enter des-cbc encryption password:
Verifying - enter des-cbc encryption password:

As you can see to encrypt with the DES-CBC its necessery to type twice the secret password “salt” keyword which will be used as an encryption key.

To decrypt later on the DES encrypted file the cmd is:

server:~# openssl des -d -salt -in file.des -out file

In order to encrypt a whole directory earlier compressed with tar zip:

server:~# tar -czf - directory | openssl des -salt -out directory.tar.gz.des

Where directory is the name of directory which will be tarred and crypted.

To later decrypt with openssl the above encrypted tar.gz.des file:

server:~# openssl des -d -salt -in directory.tar.gzdes | tar -x
 

How to configure ssh to automatically connect to non standard ssh port numbers (!port 22)

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011

SSH Artistic Logo, don't give away your password

Today I’ve learned from a admin colleague, a handy tip.
I’m administrating some Linux servers which are configured on purpose not to run on the default ssh port number (22) and therefore each time I connect to a host I have to invoke the ssh command with -p PORT_NUMBER option.

This is not such a problem, however when one has to administrate a dozen of servers each of which is configured to listen for ssh connections on various port numbers, every now and then I had to check in my notes which was the correct ssh port number I’m supposed to connect to.

To get around this silly annoyance the ssh client has a feature, whether a number of ssh server hosts can be preconfigured from the ~/.ssh/config in order to later automatically recognize the port number to which the corresponding host will be connecting (whenever) using the ssh user@somehost without any -p argument specified.

In order to make the “auto detection” of the ssh port number, the ~/.ssh/config file should look something similar to:

hipo@noah:~$ cat ~/.ssh/config
Host home.*.pc-freak.net
User root
Port 2020
Host www.remotesystemadministration.com
User root
Port 1212
Host sub.pc-freak.net
User root
Port 2222
Host www.example-server-host.com
User root
Port 1234

The *.pc-freak.net specifies that all ssh-able subdomains belonging to my domain pc-freak.net should be by default sshed to port 2020

Now I can simply use:

hipo@noah:~$ ssh root@myhosts.com

And I can connect without bothering to remember port numbers or dig into an old notes.
Hope this ssh tip is helpful.