Posts Tagged ‘dhclient’

How to install GUI on CentOS 7 Minimal and set Gnome Graphical Environment to automatically load on system boot

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2020

Reading Time: 3minutes

centos-linux-logo

I have installed CentOS 7.7 Minimal Server Linux on a VirtualBox Virtual Environment as a test bed machine.

The system got installed easily succesfully with the standard CentOS python based graphical installer, however I needed to place various software which was not there
and for that of course I needed to have a network enabled.

To make network working instead of the default Network NAT configuration for the Virtual Machine I needed to use the Network to be Attached to a Bridged Adapter in order to make
my Windows machine to provide network and (internet) access to VirtualMachine.

virtualbox-virtualmachine-bridged-networking-configuration-screenshot

Then to make networking work after booting into CentOS I had to manually fetch IP via DHCP protocol with command:
 

[root@centos :~]# dhclient enp0s3

 


ethernet0-interface-dhclient-get-ip-linux

To make the setting permanent I had to also of course modify /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-enp0s3 file and change 

 

ONBOOT=no

 

 

 

to 

ONBOOT=yes


enable-dhclient-centos-linux-shot

On next reboot CentOS boots normally with networking as expected

As by default CentOS Minimal does not provide any graphical environment however I needed to have it in my VM in order to be able to use VboxLinuxAdditions.run (VirtualBox Guest Additions plugins) that enabled the CentOS Operating System to show in Virtualbox in fullscreen and to enable the Copy / Paste buffers to work from The Hypervisor (Windows in that case) and the Guest VM (the CentOS VM).

In CentOS terminology metapackages (a  grouped package under a certain name, alias) are called simply groups) there is a "GNOME Desktop" group that can be used to install the GNOME Graphical Command from that point on with yum, like so:
 

[root@centos :~]# yum -y groups install "GNOME Desktop"


In a while the graphical environment will be in place, the command will install about 1300+ RPM packages, this will take about 5 minutes or so depending on your bandwidth connectivity. Once all is installed and configured succesfully you can use the good old startx command to launch GNOME.

 

 

[root@centos :~]# startx


centos7-linux-graphical-environment-screenshot

This of course will make Xserver and GNOME to run one time and on next reboot, you will end up in a plain text mode environment, so perhaps you will need to make the autolaunch of GNOME environment automatically on each boot in CentOS just like in most modern Linux distributions that use SYSTEMD to handle runlevels, you will need to configure it by changing the systemd default configured target via systemctl:

 

[root@centos :~]# systemctl list-units –type target | egrep "eme|res|gra|mul" 
graphical.target       loaded active active Graphical Interface
multi-user.target      loaded active active Multi-User System

 

[root@centos :~]# systemctl set-default graphical.target
multi-user.target

 

[root@centos :~]# systemctl set-default
graphical.target

 

[root@centos :~]# systemctl set-default graphical.target
graphical.target


Next step was to enable the Guest Additions to do so I had to install in advance 2 RPM packages kernel-headers and kernel-devel


[root@centos :~]# yum install -y kernel-headers kernel-devel

Then I had to mount and run the VboxLinuxAdditions.run script to enable them, i.e.:

 

[root@centos :~]# mkdir /mnt/cdrom
[root@centos :~]# mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/cdrom

[root@centos :~]# cd /mnt/cdrom/
[root@centos :~]# sh VboxLinuxAdditions.run

 


virtualbox-linux-additions-install-screenshot-centos-7-linux

 

 

 

Create local network between virtual machines in Virtualbox VM – Add local LAN between Linux Virtual Machines

Wednesday, June 11th, 2014

Reading Time: 3minutes

add-virtualbox-virtual-machines-inside-local-network-create-internal-LAN-local-net-linux-windows

I want to do test MySQL Cluster following MySQL Cluster Install Guide for that purpose, I've installed 2 version of CentOS 6.5 inside Virtualbox and I wanted to make the 2 Linux hosts reachable inside a local LAN network, I consulted some colleagues who adviced me to configure two Linux hosts to use Bridget Adapter Virtualbox networking (Network configuration in Virtualbox is done on a Virtual Machine basis from):
 

Devices -> Network Settings

(Attached to: Bridged Adapter)

Note!: that by default Cable Connected (tick) is not selected so when imposing changes on Network – tick should be set)
After Specifying Attached to be Bridged Adapter to make CentOS linux refresh network settings run in gnome-terminal:

[root@centos ~]# dhclient eth0

However CentOS failed to grab itself DHCP IP address.
Thus I tried to assign manually IP addresseswith ifconfig, hoping that at least this would work, e.g.:

on CentOS VM 1:

/sbin/ifconfig eth0 192.168.10.1 netmask 255.255.255.0

on CentOS VM 2:

/sbin/ifconfig eth1 192.168.10.2 netmask 255.255.255.0

To test whether there is connection between the 2 VM hosts tried ping-ing 192.168.10.2 (from 192.168.10.1) and tested with telnet if I can access remotely SSH (protocol), from CentOS VM2 1 to CentOS VM2 and vice versa, i.e.:

[root@centos ~]# telnet 192.168.10.2 22

 

Trying 192.168.10.2…
telnet: connect to address 192.168.10.2: No route to host

Then after checking other options and already knowing by using VBox NAT network option I had access to the internet, I tried to attach a standard local IP addresses to both Linux-es as Virtual interfaces (e.g eth0:1), .e.g:

On Linux VM 1:

/sbin/ifconfig eth0:0 192.168.10.1 netmask 255.255.255.0

On Linux VM 2:

/sbin/ifconfig eth1:0 192.168.10.2 netmask 255.255.255.0

Then to test again used telnet

[root@centos ~]# telnet 192.168.10.2 22

Then I found Virtualbox has a special Internal Networking support

to choose in Attached todrop down menu. According to Internal Networking Virtualbox instructions toput two Virtual Machine hosts inside an Internal network they should be both set in Internal network with identical name.
P. S. It is explicitly stated that using Internal Network will enable access between Guest Virtual Machines OS, but hosts will not have access to the Internet (which in my case doesn't really mattered as I needed the two Linux VMs just as a testbed)

virtualbox-create-internal-local-network-between-guest-host-Linux-Windows1

I tried this option but it doesn't work for me for some reason, after some time of research online on how to create local LAN network between 2 Virtual Machines luckily I decided to test all available Virtualbox Networking choices and noticed Host-only adapter.

Selecting Host-only Adapter and using terminal to re-fetch IP address over dhcp:

virtualbox-connect-in-local-lan-network-linux-and-windows-servers-hosts-only-adapter

On CentOS VM1

dhclient eht0

On CentOS VM2

dhclient eth1

assigned me two adjoining IPs – (192.168.56.101 and 192.168.56.102).

Connection between the 2 IPs 192.168.56.101 and 192.168.56.102 on TCP and UDP and ICMP protocol works, now all left is to install MySQL cluster on both nodes.

 

How to scan for DHCP available servers in a Network range on Linux and FreeBSD

Thursday, December 8th, 2011

Reading Time: < 1minute
GNU / Linux and FreeBSD had a nifty little program (tool) called dhcping . dhcpingsend a DHCP request to DHCP server to see if it’s up and running. dhcping is also able to send a request to DHCP servers on a whole network range and therefore it can e asily be used as a scanner to find any available DHCP servers in a network.
This makes dhcping a nmap like scanner capable to determine if dhcp servers are in a network 😉
To scan an an entire network range with dhclient and find any existing DHCP servers:

noah:~# dhcping -s 255.255.255.255 -r -v
Got answer from: 192.168.2.1
received from 192.168.2.1, expected from 255.255.255.255
no answer

In above’s output actually my Dlink wireless router returns answer to the broadcast DHCP LEASE UDP network requests of dhcping .
On a networks where there is no DHCP server available, the requests dhcping -s 255.255.255.255 -r -v returns:

noah:~# dhcping -s 255.255.255.255 -r -v
no answer

This article was inspired by a post, I’ve red by a friend (Amridikon), so thx goes to him.