Posts Tagged ‘connectivity’

Hack: Using ssh / curl or wget to test TCP port connection state to remote SSH, DNS, SMTP, MySQL or any other listening service in PCI environment servers

Wednesday, December 30th, 2020

Reading Time: 5 minutes

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If you work on PCI high security environment servers in isolated local networks where each package installed on the Linux / Unix system is of importance it is pretty common that some basic stuff are not there in most cases it is considered a security hole to even have a simple telnet installed on the system. I do have experience with such environments myself and thus it is pretty daunting stuff so in best case you can use something like a simple ssh client if you're lucky and the CentOS / Redhat / Suse Linux whatever distro has openssh-client package installed.
If you're lucky to have the ssh onboard you can use telnet in same manner as netcat or the swiss army knife (nmap) network mapper tool to test whether remote service TCP / port is opened or not. As often this is useful, if you don't have access to the CISCO / Juniper or other (networ) / firewall equipment which is setting the boundaries and security port restrictions between networks and servers.

Below is example on how to use ssh client to test port connectivity to lets say the Internet, i.e.  Google / Yahoo search engines.
 

[root@pciserver: /home ]# ssh -oConnectTimeout=3 -v google.com -p 23
OpenSSH_7.9p1 Debian-10+deb10u2, OpenSSL 1.1.1g  21 Apr 2020
debug1: Connecting to google.com [172.217.169.206] port 23.
debug1: connect to address 172.217.169.206 port 23: Connection timed out
debug1: Connecting to google.com [2a00:1450:4017:80b::200e] port 23.
debug1: connect to address 2a00:1450:4017:80b::200e port 23: Cannot assign requested address
ssh: connect to host google.com port 23: Cannot assign requested address
root@pcfreak:/var/www/images# ssh -oConnectTimeout=3 -v google.com -p 80
OpenSSH_7.9p1 Debian-10+deb10u2, OpenSSL 1.1.1g  21 Apr 2020
debug1: Connecting to google.com [172.217.169.206] port 80.
debug1: connect to address 172.217.169.206 port 80: Connection timed out
debug1: Connecting to google.com [2a00:1450:4017:807::200e] port 80.
debug1: connect to address 2a00:1450:4017:807::200e port 80: Cannot assign requested address
ssh: connect to host google.com port 80: Cannot assign requested address
root@pcfreak:/var/www/images# ssh google.com -p 80
ssh_exchange_identification: Connection closed by remote host
root@pcfreak:/var/www/images# ssh google.com -p 80 -v -oConnectTimeout=3
OpenSSH_7.9p1 Debian-10+deb10u2, OpenSSL 1.1.1g  21 Apr 2020
debug1: Connecting to google.com [172.217.169.206] port 80.
debug1: connect to address 172.217.169.206 port 80: Connection timed out
debug1: Connecting to google.com [2a00:1450:4017:80b::200e] port 80.
debug1: connect to address 2a00:1450:4017:80b::200e port 80: Cannot assign requested address
ssh: connect to host google.com port 80: Cannot assign requested address
root@pcfreak:/var/www/images# ssh google.com -p 80 -v -oConnectTimeout=5
OpenSSH_7.9p1 Debian-10+deb10u2, OpenSSL 1.1.1g  21 Apr 2020
debug1: Connecting to google.com [142.250.184.142] port 80.
debug1: connect to address 142.250.184.142 port 80: Connection timed out
debug1: Connecting to google.com [2a00:1450:4017:80c::200e] port 80.
debug1: connect to address 2a00:1450:4017:80c::200e port 80: Cannot assign requested address
ssh: connect to host google.com port 80: Cannot assign requested address
root@pcfreak:/var/www/images# ssh google.com -p 80 -v
OpenSSH_7.9p1 Debian-10+deb10u2, OpenSSL 1.1.1g  21 Apr 2020
debug1: Connecting to google.com [172.217.169.206] port 80.
debug1: Connection established.
debug1: identity file /root/.ssh/id_rsa type 0
debug1: identity file /root/.ssh/id_rsa-cert type -1
debug1: identity file /root/.ssh/id_dsa type -1
debug1: identity file /root/.ssh/id_dsa-cert type -1
debug1: identity file /root/.ssh/id_ecdsa type -1
debug1: identity file /root/.ssh/id_ecdsa-cert type -1
debug1: identity file /root/.ssh/id_ed25519 type -1
debug1: identity file /root/.ssh/id_ed25519-cert type -1
debug1: identity file /root/.ssh/id_xmss type -1
debug1: identity file /root/.ssh/id_xmss-cert type -1
debug1: Local version string SSH-2.0-OpenSSH_7.9p1 Debian-10+deb10u2
debug1: ssh_exchange_identification: HTTP/1.0 400 Bad Request

 


debug1: ssh_exchange_identification: Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8


debug1: ssh_exchange_identification: Referrer-Policy: no-referrer


debug1: ssh_exchange_identification: Content-Length: 1555


debug1: ssh_exchange_identification: Date: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 14:13:25 GMT


debug1: ssh_exchange_identification:


debug1: ssh_exchange_identification: <!DOCTYPE html>

debug1: ssh_exchange_identification: <html lang=en>

debug1: ssh_exchange_identification:   <meta charset=utf-8>

debug1: ssh_exchange_identification:   <meta name=viewport content="initial-scale=1, minimum-scale=1, width=device-width">

debug1: ssh_exchange_identification:   <title>Error 400 (Bad Request)!!1</title>

debug1: ssh_exchange_identification:   <style>

debug1: ssh_exchange_identification:     *{margin:0;padding:0}html,code{font:15px/22px arial,sans-serif}html{background:#fff;color:#222;padding:15px}body{margin:7% auto 0;max-width:390px;min-height:180px;padding:30px 0 15px}* > body{background:url(//www.google.com/images/errors/robot.png) 10
debug1: ssh_exchange_identification: 0% 5px no-repeat;padding-right:205px}p{margin:11px 0 22px;overflow:hidden}ins{color:#777;text-decoration:none}a img{border:0}@media screen and (max-width:772px){body{background:none;margin-top:0;max-width:none;padding-right:0}}#logo{background:url(//www.g
debug1: ssh_exchange_identification: oogle.com/images/branding/googlelogo/1x/googlelogo_color_150x54dp.png) no-repeat;margin-left:-5px}@media only screen and (min-resolution:192dpi){#logo{background:url(//www.google.com/images/branding/googlelogo/2x/googlelogo_color_150x54dp.png) no-repeat 0
debug1: ssh_exchange_identification: % 0%/100% 100%;-moz-border-image:url(//www.google.com/images/branding/googlelogo/2x/googlelogo_color_150x54dp.png) 0}}@media only screen and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio:2){#logo{background:url(//www.google.com/images/branding/googlelogo/2x/googlelogo_
debug1: ssh_exchange_identification: color_150x54dp.png) no-repeat;-webkit-background-size:100% 100%}}#logo{display:inline-block;height:54px;width:150px}

debug1: ssh_exchange_identification:   </style>

debug1: ssh_exchange_identification:   <a href=//www.google.com/><span id=logo aria-label=Google></span></a>

debug1: ssh_exchange_identification:   <p><b>400.</b> <ins>That\342\200\231s an error.</ins>

debug1: ssh_exchange_identification:   <p>Your client has issued a malformed or illegal request.  <ins>That\342\200\231s all we know.</ins>

ssh_exchange_identification: Connection closed by remote host

 

Here is another example on how to test remote host whether a certain service such as DNS (bind) or telnetd is enabled and listening on remote local network  IP with ssh

[root@pciserver: /home ]# ssh 192.168.1.200 -p 53 -v -oConnectTimeout=5
OpenSSH_7.9p1 Debian-10+deb10u2, OpenSSL 1.1.1g  21 Apr 2020
debug1: Connecting to 192.168.1.200 [192.168.1.200] port 53.
debug1: connect to address 192.168.1.200 port 53: Connection timed out
ssh: connect to host 192.168.1.200 port 53: Connection timed out

[root@server: /home ]# ssh 192.168.1.200 -p 23 -v -oConnectTimeout=5
OpenSSH_7.9p1 Debian-10+deb10u2, OpenSSL 1.1.1g  21 Apr 2020
debug1: Connecting to 192.168.1.200 [192.168.1.200] port 23.
debug1: connect to address 192.168.1.200 port 23: Connection timed out
ssh: connect to host 192.168.1.200 port 23: Connection timed out


But what if Linux server you have tow work on is so paranoid that you even the ssh client is absent? Well you can use anything else that is capable of doing a connectivity to remote port such as wget or curl. Some web servers or application servers usually have wget or curl as it is integral part for some local shell scripts doing various operation needed for proper services functioning or simply to test locally a local or remote listener services, if that's the case we can use curl to connect and get output of a remote service simulating a normal telnet connection like this:

host:~# curl -vv 'telnet://remote-server-host5:22'
* About to connect() to remote-server-host5 port 22 (#0)
*   Trying 10.52.67.21… connected
* Connected to aflpvz625 (10.52.67.21) port 22 (#0)
SSH-2.0-OpenSSH_5.3

Now lets test whether we can connect remotely to a local net remote IP's Qmail mail server with curls telnet simulation mode:

host:~#  curl -vv 'telnet://192.168.0.200:25'
* Expire in 0 ms for 6 (transfer 0x56066e5ab900)
*   Trying 192.168.0.200…
* TCP_NODELAY set
* Expire in 200 ms for 4 (transfer 0x56066e5ab900)
* Connected to 192.168.0.200 (192.168.0.200) port 25 (#0)
220 This is Mail Pc-Freak.NET ESMTP

Fine it works, lets now test whether a remote server who has MySQL listener service on standard MySQL port TCP 3306 is reachable with curl

host:~#  curl -vv 'telnet://192.168.0.200:3306'
* Expire in 0 ms for 6 (transfer 0x5601fafae900)
*   Trying 192.168.0.200…
* TCP_NODELAY set
* Expire in 200 ms for 4 (transfer 0x5601fafae900)
* Connected to 192.168.0.200 (192.168.0.200) port 3306 (#0)
Warning: Binary output can mess up your terminal. Use "–output -" to tell
Warning: curl to output it to your terminal anyway, or consider "–output
Warning: <FILE>" to save to a file.
* Failed writing body (0 != 107)
* Closing connection 0
root@pcfreak:/var/www/images#  curl -vv 'telnet://192.168.0.200:3306'
* Expire in 0 ms for 6 (transfer 0x5598ad008900)
*   Trying 192.168.0.200…
* TCP_NODELAY set
* Expire in 200 ms for 4 (transfer 0x5598ad008900)
* Connected to 192.168.0.200 (192.168.0.200) port 3306 (#0)
Warning: Binary output can mess up your terminal. Use "–output -" to tell
Warning: curl to output it to your terminal anyway, or consider "–output
Warning: <FILE>" to save to a file.
* Failed writing body (0 != 107)
* Closing connection 0

As you can see the remote connection is returning binary data which is unknown to a standard telnet terminal thus to get the output received we need to pass curl suggested arguments.

host:~#  curl -vv 'telnet://192.168.0.200:3306' –output –
* Expire in 0 ms for 6 (transfer 0x55b205c02900)
*   Trying 192.168.0.200…
* TCP_NODELAY set
* Expire in 200 ms for 4 (transfer 0x55b205c02900)
* Connected to 192.168.0.200 (192.168.0.200) port 3306 (#0)
g


The curl trick used to troubleshoot remote port to remote host from a Windows OS host which does not have telnet installed by default but have curl instead.

Also When troubleshooting vSphere Replication, it is often necessary to troubleshoot port connectivity as common Windows utilities are not available.
As Curl is available in the VMware vCenter Server Appliance command line interface.

On servers where curl is not there but you have wget is installed you can use it also to test a remote port

 

# wget -vv -O /dev/null http://google.com:554 –timeout=5
–2020-12-30 16:54:22–  http://google.com:554/
Resolving google.com (google.com)… 172.217.169.206, 2a00:1450:4017:80b::200e
Connecting to google.com (google.com)|172.217.169.206|:554… failed: Connection timed out.
Connecting to google.com (google.com)|2a00:1450:4017:80b::200e|:554… failed: Cannot assign requested address.
Retrying.

–2020-12-30 16:54:28–  (try: 2)  http://google.com:554/
Connecting to google.com (google.com)|172.217.169.206|:554… ^C

As evident from output the port 554 is filtered in google which is pretty normal.

If curl or wget is not there either as a final alternative you can either install some perl, ruby, python or bash script etc. that can opens a remote socket to the remote IP.

How to check Host is up with Nagios for servers with disabled ICMP (ping) protocol

Friday, July 15th, 2011

Reading Time: 2 minutes
At the company where I administrate some servers, they’re running Nagios to keep track of the servers status and instantly report if problems with connectivity to certain servers occurs.

Now one of the servers which had configured UP host checks is up, but because of heavy ICMP denial of service attacks to the servers the ICMP protocol ping is completely disabled.

In Nagios this host was constantly showing as DOWN in the usual red color, so nagios reported issue even though all services on the client are running fine.

As this is quite annoying, I checked if Nagios supports host checking without doing the ICMP ping test. It appeared it does through something called in nagios Submit passive check result for host

Enabling the “Submit passive check result for this host” could be done straight from Nagios’s web interface (so I don’t even have to edit configurations! ;).
Here is how I did it. In Nagios I had to navigate to:

Hosts -> Click over my host (hosting1) which showed in red as down

Nagios disable ICMP ping report for hosts

You see my down host which I clicked over showing in red in above pic.

On next Nagios screen I had to select, Disable active checks of this host

Nagios Disable active ICMP checks of this host
and press on the Commit button.

Next following text appears on browser:

Your command request was successfully submitted to Nagios for processing.

Note: It may take a while before the command is actually processed.

Afterwards I had to click on Submit passive check result for this host and in:
Check Output to type in:

check_tcp -p 80

Here is the Screenshot of the Command Options dialog:

Nagios submit passive check with check TCP -p 80

That’s all now Nagious should start checking the down host by doing a query if the webserver on port 80 is up and running instead of pinging it.
As well as the server is no longer shown in the Nagio’s Down host list.