Posts Tagged ‘annoying error’

phpMyAdmin No activity within 1440 seconds; please log in again Fix

Friday, July 5th, 2013

Reading Time: 2 minutes

phpmyadmin no activity within 1440 seconds please log in again screenshot Debian Gnu Linux
I had some complains from Web Developers who constantly was working on a Testing Web Development server. That their opened PhpMyadmin in browser is often closing opened session (auto logging out) with an error:
 

No activity within 1440 seconds; please log in again

This message was driving crazy people, as often they code something in PHP and design a new table or something and refreshing in browser blocked their work flow process with this annoying error …

Thanksfully there is an easy fix to that, just raise the time limit via /etc/phpmyadmin/config.inc.php

First its necessary to enable cookies authentication (by default it is commented):

Line:

//$cfg['Servers'][$i]['auth_type'] = 'cookie';

should be:

$cfg['Servers'][$i]['auth_type'] = 'cookie';

PHPMyAdmin 1140 seconds (24 minutes) timeout behavior behavior is controlled through variable: cfg['LoginCookieValidity']
Also it is necessary to increase timeout from server php.ini  (in Debian and Ubuntu via /etc/php5/apache2/php.ini or in CentOS / RHEL / Fedora Linux by editting /etc/php.ini and changing 1h session expiry setting:

session.gc_maxlifetime = 3600

to

(60*60*8  = 28800 – 8 hrs)

session.gc_maxlifetime = 28800

By default cfg['LoginCookieValidity'] is omitted from config.inc.php so you have to insert it at end of file.

A reasonable timeout value is 8 hours. To change PhPMyadmin Login TimeOut to 8 hours:

$cfg['LoginCookieValidity'] = 60 * 60 * 8; // in seconds (8 hours)

If you want to make Timeout Expire almost never (and you don't care about security) set it to some extra high timeout like 1 year  🙂

$cfg['LoginCookieValidity'] = 3600 * 24 * 365; // 1 year
 

Way to get around mdadm: /dev/md2 assembled from 1 drive – not enough to start the array.

Wednesday, July 13th, 2011

Reading Time: < 1 minute
One server with a broken Raid array was having troubles with it’s software raid.
I tried to scan the raid array via a rescue cd like so:
server:~# mdadm --assemble --scan /dev/md1

just to be suprised by the message:
mdadm: /dev/md1 assembled from 2 drives – not enough to start the array.

In /proc/mdstat respectively the raid was showing inactive, e.g.:

server:~# cat /proc/mdstat
Personalities : [raid10] [raid1]
md1 : inactive sda2[0] sdc2[2] sdb2[1]
12024384 blocks

Respectively trying to activate the software Linux raid array with:
server:~# mdadm -A -s

Couldn’t be completed because of the same annoying error:
/dev/md1 assembled from 2 drives – not enough to start the array.

Thanksfully finally thanks to some Russian, who posted having same issues reported to be able to active his software RAID with mdadm’s –force option.

Thus enabling the problematic RAID 5 array was possible with:
server:~# mdadm -A -s --force

This solution of course is temporary and will have to further check what’s wrong with the array, however at least now I can chroot to the server’s / directory. 😉

How to fix “vbAccelerator SGrid II Control Runtime Error” popup window in Windows XP

Tuesday, May 24th, 2011

Reading Time: < 1 minute
Windows XPI’m in a friend and he asked me to take a look at his Win PC.
When the Windows boots up a weird and annoying error message appears that reads:

vBAccelerator SGrid II Control Runtime Error

I figured out the SGrid II Control Runtime Error was a cause of a mis-working old Malware Bytes portable installation.

I’ve found online the following tool which fixes the stupid VBAccelerator SGrid II error

By simply downloading and starting the mbam-clean.exe binary after a computer restart the error gets fixed.