Archive for January, 2021

How to add local user to admin access via /etc/sudoers with sudo su – root / Create a sudo admin group to enable users belonging to group become superuser

Friday, January 15th, 2021

sudo_logo-how-to-add-user-to-sysadmin-group

Did you had to have a local users on a server and you needed to be able to add Admins group for all system administrators, so any local user on the system that belongs to the group to be able to become root with command lets say sudo su – root / su -l root / su – root?
If so below is an example /etc/sudoers file that will allow your users belonging to a group local group sysadmins with some assigned group number

Here is how to create the sysadmins group as a starter

linux:~# groupadd -g 800 sysadmins

Lets create a new local user georgi and append the user to be a member of sysadmins group which will be our local system Administrator (superuser) access user group.

To create a user with a specific desired userid lets check in /etc/passwd and create it:

linux:~# grep :811: /etc/passwd || useradd -u 811 -g 800 -c 'Georgi hip0' -d /home/georgi -m georgi

Next lets create /etc/sudoers (if you need to copy paste content of file check here)and paste below configuration:

linux:~# mcedit /etc/sudoers

## Updating the locate database
# Cmnd_Alias LOCATE = /usr/bin/updatedb

 

## Storage
# Cmnd_Alias STORAGE = /sbin/fdisk, /sbin/sfdisk, /sbin/parted, /sbin/partprobe, /bin/mount, /bin/umount

## Delegating permissions
# Cmnd_Alias DELEGATING = /usr/sbin/visudo, /bin/chown, /bin/chmod, /bin/chgrp

## Processes
# Cmnd_Alias PROCESSES = /bin/nice, /bin/kill, /usr/bin/kill, /usr/bin/killall

## Drivers
# Cmnd_Alias DRIVERS = /sbin/modprobe

Cmnd_Alias PASSWD = /usr/bin/passwd [a-zA-Z][a-zA-Z0-9_-]*, \
                    !/usr/bin/passwd root

Cmnd_Alias SU_ROOT = /bin/su root, \
                     /bin/su – root, \
                     /bin/su -l root, \
                     /bin/su -p root


# Defaults specification

#
# Refuse to run if unable to disable echo on the tty.
#
Defaults   !visiblepw

#
# Preserving HOME has security implications since many programs
# use it when searching for configuration files. Note that HOME
# is already set when the the env_reset option is enabled, so
# this option is only effective for configurations where either
# env_reset is disabled or HOME is present in the env_keep list.
#
Defaults    always_set_home
Defaults    match_group_by_gid

Defaults    env_reset
Defaults    env_keep =  "COLORS DISPLAY HOSTNAME HISTSIZE KDEDIR LS_COLORS"
Defaults    env_keep += "MAIL PS1 PS2 QTDIR USERNAME LANG LC_ADDRESS LC_CTYPE"
Defaults    env_keep += "LC_COLLATE LC_IDENTIFICATION LC_MEASUREMENT LC_MESSAGES"
Defaults    env_keep += "LC_MONETARY LC_NAME LC_NUMERIC LC_PAPER LC_TELEPHONE"
Defaults    env_keep += "LC_TIME LC_ALL LANGUAGE LINGUAS _XKB_CHARSET XAUTHORITY"

#
# Adding HOME to env_keep may enable a user to run unrestricted
# commands via sudo.
#
# Defaults   env_keep += "HOME"
Defaults    secure_path = /sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin

## Next comes the main part: which users can run what software on
## which machines (the sudoers file can be shared between multiple
## systems).
## Syntax:
##
##      user    MACHINE=COMMANDS
##
## The COMMANDS section may have other options added to it.
##
## Allow root to run any commands anywhere
root    ALL=(ALL)       ALL

## Allows members of the 'sys' group to run networking, software,
## service management apps and more.
# %sys ALL = NETWORKING, SOFTWARE, SERVICES, STORAGE, DELEGATING, PROCESSES, LOCATE, DRIVERS

## Allows people in group wheel to run all commands
%wheel  ALL=(ALL)       ALL

## Same thing without a password
# %wheel        ALL=(ALL)       NOPASSWD: ALL

## Allows members of the users group to mount and unmount the
## cdrom as root
# %users  ALL=/sbin/mount /mnt/cdrom, /sbin/umount /mnt/cdrom
## Allows members of the users group to shutdown this system
# %users  localhost=/sbin/shutdown -h now

%sysadmins            ALL            = SU_ROOT, \
                                   NOPASSWD: PASSWD

## Read drop-in files from /etc/sudoers.d (the # here does not mean a comment)
#includedir /etc/sudoers.d

zabbix  ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD:/usr/bin/grep


Save the config and give it a try now to become root with sudo su – root command

linux:~$ id
uid=811(georgi) gid=800(sysadmins) groups=800(sysadmins)
linux:~$ sudo su – root
linux~#

w00t Voila your user is with super rights ! Enjoy 🙂

 

Configure rsyslog buffering on Linux to avoid message lost to Central Logging server

Wednesday, January 13th, 2021

rsyslog-Centralized-Logging-System-using-Rsyslog_logo

1. Rsyslog Buffering

One of the best practice about logs management is to send syslog to a central server. However, a logging system should be capable of avoiding message loss in situations where the server is not reachable. To do so, unsent data needs to be buffered at the client when central server is not available. You might have recently noticed that many servers forwarding logs messages to a central server do not have buffering functionalities activated. Thus I strongly advise you to have look to this documentation to know how to check your configuration: http://www.rsyslog.com/doc/rsyslog_reliable_forwarding.html

Rsyslog buffering with TCP/UDP configured

In rsyslog, every action runs on its own queue and each queue can be set to buffer data if the action is not ready. Of course, you must be able to detect that "the action is not ready", which means the remote server is offline. This can be detected with plain TCP syslog and RELP, but not with UDP. So you need to use either of the two. In this howto, we use plain TCP syslog.

– Version requirement

Please note that we are using rsyslog-specific features. The are required on the client, but not on the server. So the client system must run rsyslog (at least version 3.12.0), while on the server another syslogd may be running, as long as it supports plain tcp syslog.

How To Setup rsyslog buffering on Linux

First, you need to create a working directory for rsyslog. This is where it stores its queue files (should need arise). You may use any location on your local system. Next, you need to do is instruct rsyslog to use a disk queue and then configure your action. There is nothing else to do. With the following simple config file, you forward anything you receive to a remote server and have buffering applied automatically when it goes down. This must be done on the client machine.

# Example:
# $ModLoad imuxsock             # local message reception
# $WorkDirectory /rsyslog/work  # default location for work (spool) files
# $ActionQueueType LinkedList   # use asynchronous processing
# $ActionQueueFileName srvrfwd  # set file name, also enables disk mode
# $ActionResumeRetryCount -1    # infinite retries on insert failure
# $ActionQueueSaveOnShutdown on # save in-memory data if rsyslog shuts down
# *.*       @@server:port

Short SSL generate new and self-signed certificates PEM, view and convert to and from PKCS12 to java key store cookbook commands cheat sheet

Tuesday, January 12th, 2021

OpenSSL-logo

Below is a short compilation of common used openssl commands (a kind of cookbook) helpful for sysadmins who has to commonly deal with OpenSSL certificates.

Lets say you have to generate new certificate / key and a PEM files, prepare self-signed certificates, show CSR / PEM or KEY ssl file contents, get information about certificate such as expiry date a type of encryption algorithm or sign certificate with self-signed authority convert PEM to PKCS12, convert from PKCS12 file format to .PEM, convert java X509 to java key store SSL encryptionor convert java key store format certificate to PKCS12, then below will be of use to you.

1. Generate Private RSA Key with 2048 bits

# openssl genrsa -out $ (hostname -f) .key 2048

2. Create CSR file

# openssl req -new -key $ (hostname -f) .key -out $ (hostname -f) .csr

3. Create a Self Certified Certificate:

# openssl x509 -req -days 30 -in $ (hostname -f) .csr -signkey $ (hostname -f) .key -out $ (hostname -f) .crt
Enter password:

# openssl rsa -in key.pem -out newkey.pem


4. Show CSR file content

# openssl req -in newcsr.csr -noout -text


5. Get Certificate version / serial number / signature algorithm / RSA key lenght / modulus / exponent etc.

# openssl x509 -in newcert.pem -noout -text


6. Server certificate as CA self signeded

# openssl ca -in newcert.csr -notext -out newcert.pem


7. Generate a certificate signing request based on an existing certificate

# openssl x509 -x509toreq -in certificate.crt -out CSR.csr -signkey privateKey.key


8. Convert .pem / .key / .crt file format to pkcs12 format
 

# openssl pkcs12 -export -in newcert.pem -inkey newkey.key -certfile ca.crt -out newcert.p12


9. Convert pkcs12 pfx to common .pem

# openssl pkcs12 -in mycert.pfx -out mycert.pem


10. The Formats available

# openssl x509 -inform the -in certificate.cer -out certificate.crt


11. Convert a pkcs # 7 certificate into PEM format

# openssl pkcs7 -in cert.p7c -inform DER -outform PEM -out certificate.p7b
# openssl pkcs7 -print_certs -in certificate.p7b -out certificate.pem


12. Convert X509 to java keystore file

# java -cp not-yet-commons-ssl-0.3.11.jar org.apache.commons.ssl.KeyStoreBuilder pass_for_new_keystore key.key certificate.crt

13. Convert java keystore file to pkcs12

# keytool -importkeystore -srckeystore keystore.jks -destkeystore intermediate.p12 -deststoretype PKCS12

Listing installed RPMs by vendor installed on CentOS / RedHat Linux

Friday, January 8th, 2021

Listing installed RPMs by vendor installed on CentOS / RedHat Linux

Listing installed RPMs by vendor is useful sysadmin stuff if you have third party software installed that is not part of official CentOS / RedHat Linux and you want to only list this packages, here is how this is done

 

[root@redhat ~]# rpm -qa –qf '%{NAME} %{VENDOR} %{PACKAGER} \n' | grep -v 'CentOS' | sort

criu Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
gskcrypt64 IBM IBM
gskssl64 IBM IBM
ipxe-roms-qemu Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libevent (none) (none)
libguestfs-appliance Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libguestfs-tools-c Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libguestfs Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libprlcommon Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libprlsdk-python Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libprlsdk Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libprlxmlmodel Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libtcmu Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvcmmd Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-client Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon-config-nwfilter Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon-driver-interface Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon-driver-network Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon-driver-nodedev Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon-driver-nwfilter Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon-driver-qemu Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon-driver-storage-core Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon-driver-storage Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon-kvm Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-libs Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-python Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvzctl Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvzevent Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
openvz-logos Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
p7zip-plugins Fedora Project Fedora Project
ploop-lib Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
ploop Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
prlctl Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
prl-disk-tool Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
prl-disp-service Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
python2-lockfile Fedora Project Fedora Project
python2-psutil Fedora Project Fedora Project
python-daemon Fedora Project Fedora Project
python-subprocess32 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
qemu-img-vz Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
qemu-kvm-common-vz Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
qemu-kvm-vz Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
qt Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
rkhunter Fedora Project Fedora Project
seabios-bin Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
seavgabios-bin Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
spfs Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
TIVsm-API64 IBM (none)
TIVsm-APIcit IBM (none)
TIVsm-BAcit IBM (none)
TIVsm-BA IBM (none)
vcmmd Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
vmauth Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
vzctl Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
vzkernel Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
vzkernel Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
vztt_checker Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
vztt_checker Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
vztt-lib Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
vztt Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
zabbix-agent (none) (none)

 


That instructs rpm to output each package's name and vendor, then we exclude those from "Red Hat, Inc." (which is the exact string Red Hat conveniently uses in the "vendor" field of all RPMs they pacakge).

By default, rpm -qa uses the format '%{NAME}-%{VERSION}-%{RELEASE}', and it's nice to see version and release, and on 64-bit systems, it's also nice to see the architecture since both 32- and 64-bit packages are often installed. Here's how I did that:

[root@redhat ~]# rpm -qa –qf '%{NAME}-%{VERSION}-%{RELEASE}.%{ARCH} %{VENDOR} %{PACKAGER} \n' | grep -v 'CentOS' | sort

criu-3.10.0.23-1.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
gskcrypt64-8.0-55.17.x86_64 IBM IBM
gskssl64-8.0-55.17.x86_64 IBM IBM
ipxe-roms-qemu-20170123-1.git4e85b27.1.vz7.5.noarch Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libevent-2.0.22-1.rhel7.x86_64 (none) (none)
libguestfs-1.36.10-6.2.vz7.12.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libguestfs-appliance-1.36.10-6.2.vz7.12.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libguestfs-tools-c-1.36.10-6.2.vz7.12.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libprlcommon-7.0.162-1.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libprlsdk-7.0.226-2.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libprlsdk-python-7.0.226-2.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libprlxmlmodel-7.0.80-1.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libtcmu-1.2.0-16.2.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvcmmd-7.0.22-3.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-3.9.0-14.vz7.38.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-client-3.9.0-14.vz7.38.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon-3.9.0-14.vz7.38.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon-config-nwfilter-3.9.0-14.vz7.38.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon-driver-interface-3.9.0-14.vz7.38.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon-driver-network-3.9.0-14.vz7.38.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon-driver-nodedev-3.9.0-14.vz7.38.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon-driver-nwfilter-3.9.0-14.vz7.38.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon-driver-qemu-3.9.0-14.vz7.38.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon-driver-storage-3.9.0-14.vz7.38.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon-driver-storage-core-3.9.0-14.vz7.38.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-daemon-kvm-3.9.0-14.vz7.38.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-libs-3.9.0-14.vz7.38.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvirt-python-3.9.0-1.vz7.1.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvzctl-7.0.506-1.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
libvzevent-7.0.7-5.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
openvz-logos-70.0.13-1.vz7.noarch Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
p7zip-plugins-16.02-10.el7.x86_64 Fedora Project Fedora Project
ploop-7.0.137-1.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
ploop-lib-7.0.137-1.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
prlctl-7.0.164-1.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
prl-disk-tool-7.0.43-1.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
prl-disp-service-7.0.925-1.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
python2-lockfile-0.11.0-17.el7.noarch Fedora Project Fedora Project
python2-psutil-5.6.7-1.el7.x86_64 Fedora Project Fedora Project
python-daemon-1.6-4.el7.noarch Fedora Project Fedora Project
python-subprocess32-3.2.7-1.vz7.5.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
qemu-img-vz-2.10.0-21.7.vz7.67.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
qemu-kvm-common-vz-2.10.0-21.7.vz7.67.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
qemu-kvm-vz-2.10.0-21.7.vz7.67.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
qt-4.8.7-2.vz7.2.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
rkhunter-1.4.6-2.el7.noarch Fedora Project Fedora Project
seabios-bin-1.10.2-3.1.vz7.3.noarch Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
seavgabios-bin-1.10.2-3.1.vz7.3.noarch Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
spfs-0.09.0010-1.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
TIVsm-API64-8.1.11-0.x86_64 IBM (none)
TIVsm-APIcit-8.1.11-0.x86_64 IBM (none)
TIVsm-BA-8.1.11-0.x86_64 IBM (none)
TIVsm-BAcit-8.1.11-0.x86_64 IBM (none)
vcmmd-7.0.160-1.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
vmauth-7.0.10-2.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
vzctl-7.0.194-1.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
vzkernel-3.10.0-862.11.6.vz7.64.7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
vzkernel-3.10.0-862.20.2.vz7.73.29.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
vztt-7.0.63-1.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
vztt_checker-7.0.2-1.vz7.i686 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
vztt_checker-7.0.2-1.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
vztt-lib-7.0.63-1.vz7.x86_64 Virtuozzo Virtuozzo (http://www.virtuozzo.com/support/)
zabbix-agent-3.2.11-1.el7.x86_64 (none) (none)

Backup entire Live Linux Operating System bit by bit with dd, partimage, partclone clonezilla

Thursday, January 7th, 2021


dd-create-server-hard-drive-identical-mirror-data-copy-backups

This is an old stuff that we UNIX / Linux sysadmins use frequently when we need to migrate operating system from a certain older machine server to another newer one.
However I decided to blog it as it an interesting to know to a new grown junior sysadmins.

To Create a bit to bit data backup with dd command,
the following command is used to create a backup with dd, which takes the entire data content (including partition table etc.) with it:

dd if = / dev / [hard disk 1] of = / dev / [hard disk 2] bs = 512 conv = noerror, sync


For explanation:

 

"if" stands for the hard drive to be read from.
"of" stands for the hard drive to be written to.
Important! if and of must not be interchanged under any circumstances! In the worst case, the data on the disk to be read will otherwise be irrevocably overwritten!

"bs = 512" defines the block size. The value can be increased (which in turn increases the speed of the backup), but you should be sure that the file system to be backed up does not contain any errors. If you were to use block size 64k, for example, the speed of the backup is increased considerably – but if read errors occur within this block, the entire data block that dd has written contains unusable data. Therefore, when choosing the block size, you should always weigh data integrity and time against each other.
"noerror" tells dd to continue the backup in case of errors. Without this option, dd would stop the backup by default.
"sync" commands dd to replace the unreadable blocks with zeros in the event of errors in order to keep the data offset synchronous.
When performing a backup (as with other things that a longer period can take advantage of, it is always recommended (if you SSH is logged in and no direct access to a real Shell), the process either for CTRL + followed from bg to the background (can later be brought back to the foreground with fg ) or to use virtual session managers such as screen or byobu before executing the command.This prevents the process from dying if the SSH session is unintentionally terminated and you have to start over.

Of course there are plenty of other ways to make a mirror backup  cloneof a hard disk to lets say migrate to a new data center  using easier to use tools with (ncurses) Text menu interfaces to avoid bothering a complex typing on the console.
One such tool is Partclon:

Partclone-screenshot,_partclone-linux-create-mirror-disk-backups

PartClone cloning in action

Another text menu interface data cloning Linux tool commonly used by sysadms is partimage

Partimage-linux-screenshot

Most sysadmins however prefer to use Clonezilla when something more cozy is required to do a bit to bit data copy.
Tthere is even a Live Linux CD distribution for that.

Clonezilla can mirror most types of filesystems and partiontions and could be used not only for UNIX / Linux / BSD filesystems Live OS data (backups) (EXT3 / EXT4 / XFS / ZFS etc)  migrations, but also for old NT4 Windows server partitions. One useful application of Clonezilla i can think of is if you want to configure or restore a whole office of Windows computers running on the same clean version of Windows and same hardware configurations PCs, after a Virus or trojan has striked it. By using it you can clone from a central well configured Windows release with the surrounding applications to all machines for up to an hour with Clonezilla and you can even do it over a network.

How to check Linux server power supply state is Okay / How to find out a Linux Power Supply is broken

Wednesday, January 6th, 2021

2U-power-supplies-get-status-if-Power-supply-broken-information-linux-ipmitool

If you're a sysadmin and managing remotely Linux servers, every now and then if a machine is hanging without a reason it useful to check the server Power Supply state. I say that because often if the machine is mysteriously hanging and a standard Root Cause Analysis (RCA) on /var/log/messages /var/log/dmesg /var/log/boot etc. did not bring you to any different conclusion. The next step after you send a technician to reboot the machine is to check on Linux OS level whether Power Supply Unit (PSU) hardware on the machine does not have some issues.
As blogged earlier on how to use ipmitool to manage remote ILO remote boards etc. the ipmitool can also be used to check status of Server PSUs.

Below is example output of 2 PSU server whose Power Supplies are functioning normally.
 

[root@linux-server ~]# ipmitool sdr type "Power Supply"

PS Heavy Load    | 2Bh | ok  | 19.1 | State Deasserted
Power Supply 1   | 70h | ok  | 10.1 | Presence detected
Power Supply 2   | 71h | ok  | 10.2 | Presence detected
PS Configuration | 72h | ok  | 19.1 |
PS 1 Therm Fault | 75h | ok  | 10.1 | Transition to OK
PS 2 Therm Fault | 76h | ok  | 10.2 | Transition to OK
PS1 12V OV Fault | 77h | ok  | 10.1 | Transition to OK
PS2 12V OV Fault | 78h | ok  | 10.2 | Transition to OK
PS1 12V UV Fault | 79h | ok  | 10.1 | Transition to OK
PS2 12V UV Fault | 7Ah | ok  | 10.2 | Transition to OK
PS1 12V OC Fault | 7Bh | ok  | 10.1 | Transition to OK
PS2 12V OC Fault | 7Ch | ok  | 10.2 | Transition to OK
PS1 12Vaux Fault | 7Dh | ok  | 10.1 | Transition to OK
PS2 12Vaux Fault | 7Eh | ok  | 10.2 | Transition to OK
Power Unit       | 7Fh | ok  | 19.1 | Fully Redundant

Now if you have a server lets say on an old ProLiant DL360e Gen8 whose Power Supply is damaged, you will get an from ipmitool similar to:

[root@linux-server  systemd]# ipmitool sdr type "Power Supply"
Power Supply 1   | 30h | ok  | 10.1 | 100 Watts, Presence detected
Power Supply 2   | 31h | ok  | 10.2 | 0 Watts, Presence detected, Failure detected, Power Supply AC lost
Power Supplies   | 33h | ok  | 10.3 | Redundancy Lost


If you don't have ipmitool installed due to security or whatever but you have the hardware detection software dmidecode you can use it too to get the Power Supply state

[root@linux-server  systemd]# dmidecode -t chassis
# dmidecode 3.2
Getting SMBIOS data from sysfs.
SMBIOS 2.8 present.

 

Handle 0x0300, DMI type 3, 21 bytes
Chassis Information
        Manufacturer: HP
        Type: Rack Mount Chassis
        Lock: Not Present
        Version: Not Specified
        Serial Number: CZJ38201ZH
        Asset Tag:
        Boot-up State: Critical
        Power Supply State: Critical

        Thermal State: Safe
        Security Status: Unknown
        OEM Information: 0x00000000
        Height: 1 U
        Number Of Power Cords: 2
        Contained Elements: 0

To find only Power Supply info status on a server with dmideode.

# dmidecode –type 39

monitoring-power-supply-hardware-information-linux-ipmitool

Plug between the power supply and the mainboard voltage / coms ATX specification

This can also be used on a normal Linux desktop PCs which usually have only 1U (one power supply) on many of Ubuntus and Linux desktops where lshw (list hardaware information) is installed to get the machine PSUs status with lshw 

 root@ubuntu:~# lshw -c power
  *-battery               
       product: 45N1111
       vendor: SONY
       physical id: 1
       slot: Front
       capacity: 23200mWh
       configuration: voltage=11.1V
        Thermal State: Safe
        Security Status: Unknown
        OEM Information: 0x00000000
        Height: 1 U
        Number Of Power Cords: 2
        Contained Elements: 0


Finally to get an extensive information on the voltages of the Power Supply you can use the good old lm_sensors.

# apt-get install lm-sensors
# sensors-detect 
# service kmod start

# sensors
# watch sensors


As manually monitoring Power Supplies and other various data is dubious, finally you might want to use some centralized monitoring. For one example on that you might want to check my prior Zabbix to Monitor Hardware Hard Drive / Temperature and Disk with lm_sensors / smartd on Linux with Zabbix.